feel a pain / pains / repeated pains

wanabee

Senior Member
Japanese
feel a pain / pains / repeated pains

Dear all,

If I felt pain in my stomach on and off, several times in the morning, and went to see the doctor that afternoon, would it be acceptable to say "I felt a pain in my stomach this morning, so I came to see you."?

Thank you in advance.
 
  • Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    Your sentence is correct English. However, you didn't feel a single pain, you had multiple episodes of pain. Here are a few options:

    I had some stomach pain this morning, so I came to see you. (What most people would say. Doesn't explain details, but the doctor will ask.)
    I had intermittent pain in my stomach this morning, so I came to see you. (More formal. This explains that the pain was on and off in precise terms.)
    I had on-again off-again pain in my stomach this morning, so I came to see you. (Gives same details as the earlier sentence does but very informally.)

    Also, nothing is wrong with saying "I felt pain" or "I felt a pain." But when I wrote the sentences above I used the verb to have. The reason is that for me, when I am introducing the subject for the first time, it is more natural to say "I had some pain." When the doctor asks for details, I might say use the verb to feel in my explanation, "I felt it this morning in my stomach, and then it radiated down to my intestines." This might be regional (I live in Boston) but at least for me it is classic to start a conversation with a doctor by saying that you are having pain.
     
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    wanabee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Your sentence is correct English. However, you didn't feel a single pain, you had multiple episodes of pain. Here are a few options:

    I had some stomach pain this morning, so I came to see you. (What most people would say. Doesn't explain details, but the doctor will ask.)
    I had intermittent pain in my stomach this morning, so I came to see you. (More formal. This explains that the pain was on and off in precise terms.)
    I had on-again off-again pain in my stomach this morning, so I came to see you. (Gives same details as the earlier sentence does but very informally.)

    Also, nothing is wrong with saying "I felt pain" or "I felt a pain." But when I wrote the sentences above I used the verb to have. The reason is that for me, when I am introducing the subject for the first time, it is more natural to say "I had some pain." When the doctor asks for details, I might say use the verb to feel in my explanation, "I felt it this morning in my stomach, and then it radiated down to my intestines." This might be regional (I live in Boston) but at least for me it is classic to start a conversation with a doctor by saying that you are having pain.
    Thank you very much, cyberpedant and Embonpoint.:)

    Let me ask a couple of questions for clarification:
    If "I felt a pain." is logically possible, is that based on considering the pains as a group of pains in the morning?
    Would some native English speakers actually say "I felt a pain." in such a case?
     
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    Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    Thank you very much, cyberpedant and Embonpoint.:)
    If "I felt a pain." is possible, is that based on considering the pains as a group of pains in the morning?
    Would some native English speakers actually say "I felt a pain." in such a case?
    Personally, if I say "I felt a pain" it means I had one pain, probably brief. If I had on-again off-again pain all morning, I would say "I felt pain." Actually I personally would say I had pain, but that's another issue.

    Maybe others will answer, but I can't imagine a native English speaker saying "I felt a pain" in my stomach when in fact the person had on-again off-again pain all morning.
     

    wanabee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Personally, if I say "I felt a pain" it means I had one pain, probably brief. If I had on-again off-again pain all morning, I would say "I felt pain." Actually I personally would say I had pain, but that's another issue.

    Maybe others will answer, but I can't imagine a native English speaker saying "I felt a pain" in my stomach when in fact the person had on-again off-again pain all morning.
    Thank you very much, Embonpoint!
    Everything is clear now.
     

    emre aydın

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hello, let's assume I have a pain in my stomach at the moment.

    Should I say "I feel a pain" or "I am feeling a pain" or maybe both are correct?

    Thank you for your help.
     
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