Feel Brokenhearted

namlan

Banned
Vietnam
- I just consider her as a friend. And that really makes her brokenhearted.
- I think "........makes her feel brokenhearted" is better, right?

Thanks a lot!

NamLan
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    "Makes her feel brokenhearted" sounds more natural than "makes her brokenhearted to me."

    A suggestion: the closer that "just" is to "friend," the clearer the meaning, such as in
    "consider her as just a friend."
     

    lian.alon22

    Senior Member
    US
    US-English
    I agree with bibliolept. Here's how I would write it:

    "I consider her as just a friend, and it really breaks her heart."

    It flows better than "makes her brokenhearted."
     

    lian.alon22

    Senior Member
    US
    US-English
    Hmm... true... but I think that the making her heart break is sort of awkward. It flows better to me if it just breaks her heart, rather than causing her heart to do any action on it's own. Instead, it is actively breaking her heart. It's a better visual!
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hmm... true... but I think that the making her heart break is sort of awkward. It flows better to me if it just breaks her heart, rather than causing her heart to do any action on it's own. Instead, it is actively breaking her heart. It's a better visual!
    It seems to me that it's less awkward than "makes her brokenhearted". Just like "you melt my heart" = "you make my heart melt".
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Yes - I agree. "Makes her heart break" is fine grammatically but to my ear doesn't flow as well. I note that google gives "makes her heart break" gets 13 hits whereas "breaks her heart" gets 36,400 which is quite a difference.
     

    lian.alon22

    Senior Member
    US
    US-English
    timpeac, that could be mostly due to songs. "Breaks her heart" is in more songs than I can count, and I certainly haven't heard every song there is to hear!
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    It seems to me that it's less awkward than "makes her brokenhearted". Just like "you melt my heart" = "you make my heart melt".
    I agree it's better than "makes her brokenhearted" but that doesn't make "breaks her heart" better than "makes her heart break".

    I think that the difference between "makes her heart melt" (which sounds fine) and "makes her heart break" is in the intransitive verb itself. Things which can melt often do - it is a very common intransitive verb. Things rarely spontaneously break. I'm just trying to rationalise why "makes her heart melt" is fine but "makes her heart break" is clunky.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    timpeac, that could be mostly due to songs. "Breaks her heart" is in more songs than I can count, and I certainly haven't heard every song there is to hear!
    Well, Google is certainly always to be taken with a pinch of salt, but you could ask why "breaks her heart" is in more songs than you can count whereas "makes her heart break" isn't;).
     

    lian.alon22

    Senior Member
    US
    US-English
    Very true... Personally, I think of it as better imagery, but I'm sure most people don't analyze things as deeply as I do. I tend to overthink!
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I agree it's better than "makes her brokenhearted" but that doesn't make "makes her heart break" better than "makes her heart break".

    I think that the difference between "makes her heart melt" (which sounds fine) and "makes her heart break" is in the intransitive verb itself. Things which can melt often do - it is a very common intransitive verb. Things rarely spontaneously break. I'm just trying to rationalise why "makes her heart melt" is fine but "makes her heart break" is clunky.
    Yes, now I see it.

    "breaks her heart" - here "break" is transitive

    "makes her heart break" - in this case "break" is intransitive

    That makes a whole lot of sense. :D
     
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