feel friendly and gain friendship

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering whether the underlined part is idiomatic:

"You can feel friendly gain friendship between you and your classmates if you be polite to them and try to help them.."

Thoughts: This is written by a Chinese English learner. He wanted to say that if you help others, others will be friendly to you. You can feel the atmosphere between you and your friend change and you gain the friendship.
 
  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think it is idiomatic.
    Feel friendly would work in a different context. He'd just insulted my parents, so I wasn't feeling very friendly towards him. You can feel friendly towards your classmates suggests to me that at another time you might feel unfriendly towards them. Be friendly would be better.

    Gain friendship sounds a bit odd. You could say make friends with your classmates.

    (It should be are polite.)
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I don't think it is idiomatic.
    Feel friendly would work in a different context. He'd just insulted my parents, so I wasn't feeling very friendly towards him. You can feel friendly towards your classmates suggests to me that at another time you might feel unfriendly towards them. Be friendly would be better.

    Gain friendship sounds a bit odd. You could say make friends with your classmates.

    (It should be are polite.)
    Would it be idiomatic like:

    "You can make friends with your classmates and find they are friendly to you if you are polite to them and try to help them."
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Would it be idiomatic like:

    "You can make friends with your classmates and find they are friendly to you if you are polite to them and try to help them."
    You can make friends with your classmates if you are polite and try to help them.

    ".......and find they are friendly" in that sentence is not necessary in my opinion (if you have made friends with them one would assume that they would be friendly). :)
     

    8thnote

    Senior Member
    English-Southern US
    "Make friends with" implys that both parties are acting friendly toward each other.

    While your example in post 3 is not incorrect, a native speaker would simplify it by saying "You can make friends with your classmates if you are polite and try to help them. " The meaning is essentially the same.

    edit: ripper beat me to it!
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    You can make friends with your classmates if you are polite and try to help them.

    ".......and find they are friendly" in that sentence is not necessary in my opinion (if you have made friends with them one would assume that they would be friendly). :)
    Got it. Thank you very much.

    "Make friends with" implys that both parties are acting friendly toward each other.

    While your example in post 3 is not incorrect, a native speaker would simplify it by saying "You can make friends with your classmates if you are polite and try to help them. " The meaning is essentially the same.

    edit: ripper beat me to it!
    Got it. Thank you very much.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Would it be idiomatic like:

    "You can make friends with your classmates and find they are friendly to you if you are polite to them and try to help them."
    And find they are friendly to you doesn't sound quite right. It suggests they're friendly anyway regardless of your behaviour towards them. They'll be friendly to you would be better. But I agree with Little Ripper and 8thnotethat it's not really necessary. To make friends with people means that both sets of people are friendly towards each other.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "You can feel friendly gain friendship
    This is wrong as there are two active verbs in the sentence, either that or gain is a countable noun and would require a determiner and finally, if gain is a noun, friendly cannot qualify gain in this context.

    In short, it is completely wrong.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think you can gain happiness. You can be happy. And I don't think you can gain friendship. You can win friends. Slurping your soup won't win you a lot of friends.
     
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