Feel the blow

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Hello everyone,

Does "feel the blow" meaning "feel the bad effects of something (either literally physically in a fight or metaphorically)'' sound natural/correct in the examples that I created below?

a. [Two men are fighting in a ring and one (John) gets punched]: (Sports commentator): John was hit hard on the stomach in the last round, and now he seems to be feeling the blow. He probably won't continue to fight today.
b. Our country is feeling the blow after five years in political and economic crisis.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To “feel the blow” seems to be an idiom (AE?) meaning much the same as “bear the brunt” of something (be the one most affected by it).
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I, an AE-speaker, have no problem with either sentence.
    "Blow"in the first sentence is a literal "blow" while "blow" in the second sentence is a figurative "blow."
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    But "five years in political and economic crisis" is a sign of a 'blow'.
    :tick:
    If the five years was the result of something specific, that thing would have been the blow.
    :tick:
    Let's imagine that there was reference to a coup in the country before the statement was made.
    The five years spent in political and economic crisis was a result of the coup.
    The country is still feeling the effect of the coup (is still feeling the blow) after the resulting political and economic crises.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Just wanted to add that, if you want to change the meaning to express that the political and economic crises are the blow,
    you would say: Our country is feeling the blow of five years of political and economic crises.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'm not happy with either one. They both seem too separate from the action.

    A. If he was hit hard in the last round that's when he felt the blow. He might still be feeling it but he didn't just start feeling it.

    John was hit hard in the stomach in the last round, and he seems to still be feeling the blow.

    B. Our country is feeling the blow after five years in political and economic crisis.

    A blow is a specific short and sharp action, even figuratively. Something specific happens. In this sentence there are no actions and nothing that is short and sharp. It's like saying, "I'm feeling the blow after not eating for four days." There is no blow, just a series of unfortunate events.

    Here's an example from the COCA database:
    Netflix's original content push will likely soften the blow of Disney's departure.

    Here there is a figurative blow. The short, sharp action is that Disney has dissolved its partnership with Netflix.

    You could then later write something like:
    Six months after Disney's abrupt departure, Netflix is still feeling the blow.

    I noticed both of my examples talk about continuing to feel a blow (or the ongoing effects of a blow) that happened in the past.

    Both of the originals talk about only feeling a blow after time has passed. That doesn't seem like a logical use of "feeling the blow" to me.
     
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