feeling a bit shagged and fagged and fashed

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almostfreebird

Senior Member
Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés
This is a monologue from "A Clockwork Orange":

<<Alex(Malcolm McDowell): We were all feeling a bit shagged and fagged and fashed, it being a night of no small expenditure.>>

I figured out all these three words mean "tired".
Are they feasible and permissible in casual conversation?

Thank you all in advance.
 
  • judkinsc

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    In the US, I wouldn't. I've never heard of "fashed" before, "shagged" is almost as rare, and "fagged" seems crude.

    So, I recommend "tired", "fatigued", "weary", "dog-tired", "exhausted", and so on. "Dog-tired" is the most casual.
     

    almostfreebird

    Senior Member
    Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés
    <<I've never heard of "fashed" before>>

    Actually I couldn't find the word in any dictionary,
    it must be an argot.
     

    quark44

    New Member
    English USA
    I have to agree completely with judkinsc on this one.


    I have never heard "fashed" either. "Shagged" and "Fagged" would most likely be misinterpreted, at least in the US. The first is known British slang with a sexual meaning (think Austin Powers), and the second isn't said in the US but is very similar to another very offensive slang word. Though they may be correct in the dictionary, people would in all probability misunderstand your meaning.
     

    nushh

    Senior Member
    en-gb / es-es
    Remember Burgess made up quite a lot of the words Alex and his friends use (you probably wouldn't have heard of "droogs" before A Clockwork Orange either). I'm guessing "fashed" is another of those invented words. And as for the other two, I agree with quark44: "shagged" I've heard often, but meaning a completely different thing :), "fagged" sounds far too similar to a certain insult... even if it's the only one some people use instead of "wrecked", "exhausted"... Anyway, just to be safe, I wouldn't use any of them instead of "tired"...

    In case you're interested, I once saw an Alex-English online translator - it was fun to try :) You might still find it if you google it.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    hi - isn't there a glossary in the back of the text? I'm sure there was when I read it. Oh, maybe you only have an extract?

    As for using anyof these words, some people do say "I'm fagged out" and it is not vulgar, in the UK, but it is not particularly wide-spread.

    Shagged out is also used but is a bit more taboo, shag is a synonym for sex.

    I've a feeling I've heard Scottish people use fashed - but I'm not sure of the context.

    Words / phrases for being tired are legion some are more taboo than others:

    I'm knackered (mildy taboo)
    I'm shattered
    I'm pooped
    I'm fucked (taboo)
     

    almostfreebird

    Senior Member
    Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Fashed is an invented word:eek:
    Well, I suppose that's right - all words were "invented" at some time. This one was invented some time before 1533. It means troubled, worried, annoyed, bothered, vexed - from the same root as the modern French fâcher.
    But dinna fash yersel', it is not commonly used outside the northern parts of the British Isles:)


    [Dinna fash yersel' = Please do not trouble yourself.]
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Anthony Burgess is an English author who incorporated a lot of slang into his work. It is not surprising that our American contributors are not familiar with a lot of his words, except from 'A Clockwork Orange'. In 'A Clockwork Orange' Anthony Burgess also invented a lot of slang, mostly from Russian words, but 'shagged', 'fagged' and 'fashed' are not examples of this. They are all in my (single volume) dictionary (Collins).

    To summarise (mostly) what other posters have said,

    - 'shagged', for 'exhausted', is common in British English, but taboo;

    - I would say that 'fagged' or 'fagged out' is now rather dated slang for 'exhausted', but my dictionary (Collins) just marks it as 'informal'; probably it was more current in 1962 (the date of 'A Clockwork Orange') than it is now;

    - My dictionary (Collins) marks 'fash' = 'to trouble, bother, annoy' as Scottish, but it sounds like Panjanrum is familiar with it from Ireland too http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulster_Scots. I am not Scottish or Irish and I am not familiar with this word. I suppose that it comes from French like many Scottish words we don't use so much in England - Auld Alliance and all that. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auld_Alliance
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    While a few of the neologisms of A Clockwork Orange became fashionable among a few Dubliners in my youth, I don't recall "fashed" being one of them.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    almostfreebird said:
    This is a monologue from "A Clockwork Orange":

    <<Alex(Malcolm McDowell): We were all feeling a bit shagged and fagged and fashed, it being a night of no small expenditure.>>

    I figured out all these three words mean "tired".
    Are they feasible and permissible in casual conversation?

    Thank you all in advance.
    Don't use any of these words in casual conversation.

    In particular be careful with fag.
    In the US, fag or faggot is an offensive word for a male homosexual.
     
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