Feeling devilish

BlackInk

Senior Member
Castellano (España) /Català (Castelló)
Reading this sentence,

Feeling particularly devilish, she checked her tongue for a split second before letting the words roll.

Do you think she feels devilish after doing the gesture?

Or do you think she does the gesture because she feels particularly devilish in that moment?

Could be both options correct at the same time?

:confused:
 
  • Plasticapple

    Member
    English (British)
    She doesn't really do any gesture - checking her tongue means she stays quiet for a moment, then says what she wants. I think she 'lets the words roll' because she's feeling devilish.
     

    BlackInk

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España) /Català (Castelló)
    Sorry, I should have explained that she is flirting and the other person is waiting for an answer. Before answering, she check her tongue to make him wait a bit more.

    And what I wanted to know is if she does that because she feels particularly devilish that night, or if she feels particularly devilish after making him wait for the answer.
     

    Plasticapple

    Member
    English (British)
    Ah, sorry, my interpretation was slightly wrong then. In that case she checks her tongue because she feels devilish. (She very probably continues to feel devilish afterwards, but I don't think that's specifically what the author's saying.)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Just a PS: "she checked her tongue" sounds slightly unnatural to me - like the language of a particular type of historical romance.

    Where did you find the sentence, BlackInk?
     

    BlackInk

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España) /Català (Castelló)
    Just a PS: "she checked her tongue" sounds slightly unnatural to me - like the language of a particular type of historical romance.

    Where did you find the sentence, BlackInk?
    It is from a book edited around 2000. It is settled nowadays, nothing old neither historical.

    Maybe the author wanted to cause that effect but I can tell you the book is up-to-date :)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with biblio:)

    Like Rover, I'd still like to know where you found this....
     

    Starfrown

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think we may take "check her tongue" as simply the writer's variant of "hold her tongue." If I were the author, I would probably write instead:

    "She held/checked her tongue for a split second, but then, feeling particulary devilish, she let the words roll."

    I don't think "let the words roll" is an established idiom, but I wouldn't have any problem with it.
     
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