fell 32 stories <on to> a side walk

fh3579

Senior Member
Chinese
The following sentence is cited from a textbook for English learners:
Of the 115 cats studied, 90 percent survived, including one cat that fell 32 stories on to a side walk and suffered only mild chest injury and a chipped tooth.
Do you think "on to" should be "onto"?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    There used to be a peculiar BrE publishing convention where 'on to' was always used, regardless of its meaning, and 'onto' was considered an Americanism. I hope those days are over now, but you still see 'on to' sometimes where 'onto' is natural. We were quite rational about 'into'.
     

    fh3579

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks entangledbank and Copyright.
    To entangledbank:We were quite rational about 'into'. What does this mean? Does it mean "into" are hardly seen in seperate form, "in to".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would use "onto." And "sidewalk." And "a minor chest injury."
    I agree.

    I also would use "onto" but would not correct anyone who wrote "on to". But "sidewalk" in my opinion always has to be one word if you are talking about the concrete walkway we walk on. A "side walk" for me would be a walk off the beaten path.
     
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