felt it to be insoluble

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joel123

Senior Member
persian
Does "insoluble" refer to " a curious moral and physiological problem for solution"?

It was not exactly mistrust—for both manners were perfectly frank and natural—so much as perplexity. He seemed to be two opposite characters rolled into one, and to be presenting undesigningly a curious moral and physiological problem for solution, which had a disagreeable sort of attractiveness about it, for you almost immediately felt it to be insoluble, and yet it would not let you rest. He might be the best or the worst of men."
" The History of Spiritualism, by Arthur Conan Doyle "
 
  • joel123

    Senior Member
    persian
    It does indeed. "It" is the psychological problem.
    thanks. What is the author's intention When he says "it was not mistrust so much as perplexity"?
    Does it mean "it was not about suspicion or confusion"?
     
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