female poet/sailor/farmer?

Sniegurochka

Senior Member
Russian
Is there a way to distinguish between masculine and feminine 1st declension nouns in Latin? Or is it the same form for both genders with the only distinction made by the agreement of adjectives, should there be any? For example, would I say:
Sappho magna poeta graeca est.
Is there another way (form, phrase) of "poeta"?
 
  • Hamlet2508

    Senior Member
    English
    As there is only one form of poeta for both genders you can only specify the gender by means of the adjective-noun agreement.

    Sappho magna poeta Graeca est.:tick:

    There is another word for poet(ess) , namely vates,-is m./f. , although this expression carries slightly different connotations.
     

    Sniegurochka

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Are there precedents in literature of 1 decl. masculine nouns (poeta, nauta, etc.) used for female representatives of these occupations and/or in agreement with feminine adjectives etc.? Or are such constructions simply avoided?
     

    CapnPrep

    Senior Member
    AmE
    Are there precedents in literature of 1 decl. masculine nouns (poeta, nauta, etc.) used for female representatives of these occupations and/or in agreement with feminine adjectives etc.? Or are such constructions simply avoided?
    Not so much avoided as simply not needed, I would think… There is no grammatical reason not to treat these as common gender or epicene nouns. There are adjectives in the same declension class, like ruricola and indigena, that can modify nouns referring to females. And many nouns like transfuga, conviva, auriga, athleta :)eek:), etc. are listed as common gender (although you'd have to check to see if there are really attested examples of the feminine in Classical Latin). So why not agricola?

    I think that if you came across a female nauta, athleta, pirata, etc. in Roman times, it would be exceptional enough that you probably wouldn't just depend on feminine agreement clues to reveal this fact to your audience. But once it's established that you're talking about a woman, maybe you would just continue with illa pirata, etc. Or, as in the case of poeta, use a specifically feminine word instead.
     
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