feminist critique knocked Lawrence off his Priest-of-Love pedastal

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
The following words were written by Chathrine Brown(here)

Neither decade had been distinguished for feminism. The backlash came in the seventies, with so-called ‘second-wave’ feminism (‘first-wave’ was the suffragettes). In 1970 Kate Millett’s Sexual Politics attacked Lawrence for misogyny and phallocentrism (behaving as though the world revolves around penises). The feminist critique knocked Lawrence off his Priest-of-Love pedastal, since when he hasn’t nearly managed to clamber back on.

The last sentence is quite difficult to me. How should I understand it please?
I try to rephrase it as:
The feminist criticism separated(=knocked) Lawrence from(=from) his Priest-of-Love pedastal(=pedestal, a typo), since (the time) when he hasn't(hadn't?) nearly succeeded(=managed) climbing back (onto the place where the dedestal is).

Thank you in advance
 
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  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    It's a metaphor. Imagine a sculpture on a pedestal. Someone knocks the sculpture off the pedestal, and now it's lying on the ground.

    Now imagine the "someone" is feminist critique, the "sculpture" is Lawrence, and the "pedestal" is the place for a Priest-of-Love. When Lawrence has been knocked off that place -- he is no longer Priest of Love.

    From then on, Lawrence has never been considered Priest-of-Love as he used to be (or metaphorically -- has never managed to clamber back onto his Priest-of-Love pedestal on which he used to rest).
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you. So there are two mistakes in the sentence:
    pedastal——pedestal
    since when—since then

    Am I right?
    By the way, I find your English quite good, even if you are a Russian
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'Since when' is quite correct. It is equivalent to 'since which time'.

    In other words, 'Since when he hasn't ...' means:
    'after which he has not yet ...'

    We can take the equivalence further, because a relative pronoun or adverb is equivalent to a coordinating conjunction plus a demonstrative. That is, 'which' here means 'and that' and 'when' means 'and then'.

    Thus 'since when' = 'since which time' = 'and since that time' = 'and since then'.

    I hope that is clear.
     
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    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Yes, "pedastal" is a mistake, but "since when" is not -- "since when he hasn’t nearly managed to clamber back on" is a relative clause.

    By the way, I find your English quite good, even if you are a Russian
    Thank you:) I hope by "Russian" you meant "non-native speaker", not particulary a Russian non-native speaker though:D

    x-posted
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you, Long, for that extremely interesting link to Dr Catherine Brown's comments about DHL and the response of the 'feminist movement' to his work.
    I need to think about it.
    Meanwhile, would you please pay attention to the details, such as the spelling of people's names and their title? You owe this to yourself, as a scholar.
    " Genius lies in attention to detail" :rolleyes:
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    hasn't(hadn't?) nearly (anywhere near) succeeded(=managed) in climbing back (onto the place where the pedestal is).

    "To have not nearly <verbed>" is an idiomatic, informal construction -> "to have not even reached the minimum standard of <verbing>."
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with wandle's #4.

    The present perfect tense 'he hasn't managed' is correct. Although he is dead in person, his writings are still alive, real and present and controversial. That's why we use the present perfect rather than the past perfect.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thanks a lot for all the help.
    Meanwhile, would you please pay attention to the details, such as the spelling of people's names and their title? You owe this to yourself, as a scholar.
    " Genius lies in attention to detail"
    I will pay more attention to details. And I like the address of scholar, even if I'm not.
     
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