femme de non-recevoir

Wittgenstein

Member
English - Australian
Okay, so here's a challenge. A guy sets up a date and the woman stands him up. Resigned to the fact, because it's not the first time it has happened to him, he says to someone,

"J'ai bien compris, une fois de plus, que c’était là une femme de non-recevoir"

It's quite clever, in my view, but he says it, or so I'm told, without knowing what he is saying. But in any case, does anyone have any suggestions for an English translation that might in some way keep, or give an idea of, the play on words?
 
  • CryTogether

    Member
    French, Français
    Bonjour

    Je pense que l'homme dit, en fait, une "fin de non-recevoir", ce qui signifie qu'il s'agit d'un refus de la part de la femme. La locution "fin de non-recevoir" est utilisé dans le domaine juridique pour rejeter la demande de l'adversaire. Mais ici, la femme refuse le rendez-vous, indirectement, en n'y allant pas. Elle lui a posé un lapin, en fait.
    Alors je ne sais pas s'il s'agit d'un jeu de mots (a play on words) ou si vous avez juste mal entendu, ce qui peut arriver.
    J'espère avoir pu vous aider à mieux comprendre en tout cas le sens de la phrase.
     

    Wittgenstein

    Member
    English - Australian
    Thank you so much for your thoughts, but I don't have any problem with "Une fin de non-recevoir". It can be translated as "point blank refusal" or "knockback" in the context of a woman. But the point is that he was confused -- he thought the expression was "femme de non-recevoir". He could have made it as a pun, and it would have been quite a nice one, actually. I've been wracking my brain but can't for the life of me think of anything in English that might capture or correspond to the double sense here. . . .

    But thank you for taking the time to reply.
     

    CryTogether

    Member
    French, Français
    Since "femme de non-recevoir" is not at all a usual expression, personally, I've never heard this, I do not think we can think of something that might correspond to the double sense. But you, you get the meaning of it then you can try by your own to find a (new) expression that might keep this idea !
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    Both rather forced but:
    Now I don't have a birdon. She found it a birden.
    It wasn't chick behaviour.
     
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