Ferret animal

j.Constantine

New Member
Spanish
Hello i wonder

How do you say in your languaje ferret an mustelidae small animal?

Thanks



images.jpeg
 
  • Olaszinhok

    Senior Member
    Standard Italian
    How do you say in your languaje ferret an mustelidae small animal?
    Why didn't you start by saying that in Spanish?! :confused:

    Furetto in Italian from Latin fur-furis (thief), due to its ability to drive out wild rabbits.

    Hurón in Spanish, strangely enough, hurón has the same etymology as Italian furetto but with the dropped initial F, which is quite common in Spanish.
     
    Last edited:

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Cymraeg/Welsh

    ffured, ffuret, ffurell
    (all feminine nouns).

    Welsh letter <ff> is always /f/. (It's not a typo.)
     
    Greek:

    «Νυφίτσα» [niˈfi.ʦ͡a] (fem.) < ByzGr fem. diminutive «νυ(μ)φίτσα» ny(m)phítsa of fem. «νύ(μ)φη» ný(m)phē < Classical fem. noun «νύμφη» númpʰē --> bride, young lady, nymph (lesser goddess of rivers/lakes/forests), from possible PIE root *sneu̯bʰ- cf Lat. nūbere + productive suffix in Byz & MoGr to form fem. diminutives «-ίτσα» [-íʦ͡a] influenced from the Byz.Gr. neut. diminutive «-ίτσιν» -ítsin following tsitakism (affrication of [k] > [ʦ]) of Koine «-ίκιν» -íkin < Classical neut. diminutive suffix
    «-ίκιον» -íkiŏn.
    In Ancient Greek the animal's name was «γαλέη/γαλῆ» găléē (fem. uncontracted)/«γαλῆ» gălê (contracted), from PIE *gl̥Hi-/*gl̥h₁eu̯s- mouse, dormouse, weasel cf Skt. गिरि (girí), mouse, Lat. glīs, dormouse. According to Beekes:
    Beekes said:
    ...the formation of γαλέη shows that the word originally indicated the skin cf ἀλωπεκ-έη/ἀλωπεκ-ῆ (ălōpĕkéē/ălōpĕkê), fox
    Note that γαλέη was used as a pet by the ancient Greeks to hunt down rabbits or mice, but after the import of cats from Egypt, the new animal was much more preferable because the Egyptian hunter was less...stinky than the previous one. Γαλέη/γαλῆ then became the colloquial vernacular name of the new imported animal.

    Edit: Added ancient name
     
    Last edited:

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    In Ancient Greek the animal's name was «γαλέη/γαλῆ» găléē
    That is why, they say, Leonardo painted Cecilia Gallerani with a ferret in her arms, because of the resemblance of her name with the Greek word for "ferret" (or weasel, or ermine)....
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan:
    fura

    Aragonese:
    furón

    All these Romance forms starting with fur- (and the English ferret too) come from derivations of the Latin fur 'thief', and therefore are related to the way of saying "theft" in most Romance languages (furt, furto, hurto).
     

    Torontal

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Hungarian:

    Polecat is görény
    Ferret is vadászgörény (vadász=hunting).

    The word görény is an old loan from a Chuvash/Bulgar/Ogur type Turkic language.
     
    Hungarian:

    Polecat is görény
    Ferret is vadászgörény (vadász=hunting).

    The word görény is an old loan from a Chuvash/Bulgar/Ogur type Turkic language.
    Polecat in Greek is «οζοϊκτίς» [ɔ.zɔ.iˈktis] (fem.) or «βρωμοκούναβο» [vrɔ.mɔˈku.na.vɔ] (neut.).
    The former is the formal/scientific name and means strong-smelling marten = compound, first element «ὀζο-» ŏzŏ- from the Classical verb «ὄζω» ózō --> to smell, scent (PIE *h₃ed- to smell cf Lat. odōrāre, Lith. užuosti, to smell) + Classical fem. noun «ἴκτις» íktĭs --> marten (of unknown etymology).

    The latter is the MoGr vernacular name, a hybrid word, and means...strong-smelling-marten = compound, oblique «βρωμο-» [vrɔ.mɔ-] as first element in compounds --> strong-smelling, foul-smelling < MoGr fem. noun «βρώμα» [ˈvrɔ.ma] --> foul smell, stench < Classical masc. «βρῶμος» brômŏs or fem. «βρῶμα» brômă --> stench, ordure (of unknown etymology) + MoGr neut. «κουνάβι» [kuˈna.vi] --> marten < ByzGr neut. diminutive «κουνάβι(ο)ν» kounábi(o)n & «κουνάδι(ο)ν» kounádi(o)n < South Slavic куна < Proto-Slavic *kuna, marten.
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    I've always known this animal as a "polecat".
    According to Wikipedia:

    Polecat (Mustelinae) is a carnivorous mammal related to the weasel. Its domesticated variety is referred to as ferret.

    Polecat is a common name [...]; the name is applied to several species with broad similarities (including having a dark mask-like marking across the face) to European polecats, the only polecat species native to the British Isles.

    In the United States, the term polecat is sometimes applied to the black-footed ferret, a native member of the Mustelinae. In Southern United States dialect, the term polecat is sometimes used as a colloquial nickname for the skunk, which are only distantly related.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    In the US, I expect 'polecat' is another word for 'skunk' in the East and Midwest. I've never lived in the southern US, and to me 'polecat' is the same as 'skunk,' and has nothing to do with black-footed ferrets.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    In the US, I expect 'polecat' is another word for 'skunk' in the East and Midwest. I've never lived in the southern US, and to me 'polecat' is the same as 'skunk,' and has nothing to do with black-footed ferrets.
    Really? Skunk and polecat are the same for you? Those are clearly different for me. The word that isn't clear is ferret

    Ferret is one of those words I'd never have learned if I hadn't gone abroad. It's the usual case where someone uses the word and I have no idea what they are talking about. No dictionary helps. I have to do research and then come to the conclusion what it is. It often happens with wild animals
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    If I were to name three mustelids off the top of my head, I'd say skunks, weasels, and fishers (aka fisher cats). Perhaps the reason I associate 'polecat' with 'skunk' more than with ''black-footed ferret' is because I have no idea what a black-footed ferret is. I do know what a weasel is, though -- the small variety of weasel looks like a ferret -- but I don't think I've ever heard anyone call a weasel a polecat.

    I don't think ferrets crossed my consciousness until friends of mine got a couple of them as pets.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Skunks'll always be mustelids to me. :) At least they are still in the 'extended family' of Musteloidea.

    Mephitidae -- like mephitic. If I were a skunk I would not take kindly to that name.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    If I were to name three mustelids off the top of my head, I'd say skunks, weasels, and fishers (aka fisher cats). Perhaps the reason I associate 'polecat' with 'skunk' more than with ''black-footed ferret' is because I have no idea what a black-footed ferret is. I do know what a weasel is, though -- the small variety of weasel looks like a ferret -- but I don't think I've ever heard anyone call a weasel a polecat.

    I don't think ferrets crossed my consciousness until friends of mine got a couple of them as pets.
    People are a bit crazy to have them as pets. They're small but they're still wild. I had someone tell me they had one as a pet too and I had to do research to understand what it could be, and I came up with polecat.

    Look at the photo in post number 1, you wouldn't call that a skunk would you? Weasles are big things. Now you stumped me because I don't know what a fisher is. I checked out the picture on wikipedia. They look scary. I'm from too far south to have ever seen one of those animals.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    I would call the animal in #1 a weasel. It's definitely not a skunk. I'm not saying that what you call a weasel I call a skunk - I'm saying that 'polecat,' the 'nickname' you use for weasel, is the 'nickname' I know for skunk.

    The least weasels I've seen are pretty little. They're about the size of a hefty gray squirrel (I'm not counting the tail of either animal) but much more slender. They're definitely smaller than a skunk.
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    Swedish, Finnish
    Swedish: Mustela putorius - iller (a word with unknown origin).
    Finnish: hilleri or lahokas (the first from the Swedish, the second is also the name of a kind of mushrooms, might have something to do with the word laho, meaning rotten, the mushroom grows on rotten tree stumps, why the name of the animal I don't know).
     

    hui

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Swedish: Mustela putorius - iller (a word with unknown origin).
    Finnish: hilleri or lahokas (the first from the Swedish, the second is also the name of a kind of mushrooms, might have something to do with the word laho, meaning rotten, the mushroom grows on rotten tree stumps, why the name of the animal I don't know).

    Swedish (according to Wikipedia):
    tamiller ("tame-polecat") or frett = ferret
    iller = European polecat

    Finnish:
    fretti = ferret
    hilleri = European polecat
    lahokas (dialectal [map], obsolete) = hilleri
    lahonäätä ( "rot-marten"; dialectal [map], obsolete) = hilleri

    Several mushrooms end with -kas but the mushroom that grows on rotten tree stumps is lahokka.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    In Britain we have weasels, stoats, (the weasels are weaselly distinguishable and stoats are stoatally different). Both are tiny, stoats always have a black tip to their tail when they are often called ermine, polecats are bigger but not enormous and are quite rare. Ferrets are a tame derivation of polecats and are often white and albino these sometimes go feral but they have been used for hunting mice and rats. Martens are slightly bigger and reddish brown these are rare. Mink have become feral and can a problem. The largest of the mustelids is the badger. All these are native to Europe and probably commoner than in Britain.
     
    Top