Fever

Dr.Appalayya

Senior Member
India;Telugu
Hell friends, Please help me write correctly the following.

I got fever. What is the passive voice of it ? I want to express that fever came to my body. I want to make fever the subject. How?
 
  • LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Hello, :)
    I have no idea how you can turn that sentence into the passive form. I think you simply can't.
    However, you can always use "fever" as the subject of an active sentence.

     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Hello, Dr. Appalayya. I don't think we normally express it this way. It was more common in the past, I think, at least from my reading.

    I suppose you could say,

    "I was overcome by a fever." (a bit dramatic and old-fashioned sounding)
    "I was stricken with a fever." (very literary-sounding to me)
    "I came down with a fever." (not too passive, but much more common)

    Perhaps someone else will have a better suggestion.

    I honestly can't think of a way to put it in a true passive voice.
     

    shrek99

    New Member
    English Australia
    If you were to use:
    I was taken by a bad fever last week.....it would be easily understood 'down under..under' in Tasmania. Possibly a somewhat countrified expression, but if you want to use a passive construction it certainly would not sound ridiculous here.
     

    Dr.Appalayya

    Senior Member
    India;Telugu
    Thanks, JamesM, Shrekk99, Porteno. Great community indeed. Can you also help me in the following situation.

    What is the best expression for " Fever attacked me in the morning?"
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Thanks, JamesM, Shrekk99, Porteno. Great community indeed. Can you also help me in the following situation.

    What is the best expression for " Fever attacked me in the morning?"
    I think we may have different mental images for a fever in our different languages. To me, in English, we treat the fever as a symptom of something attacking us, not the actual thing that is attacking us. The fever is thought of as a defense our system is mounting against something that is attacking our bodies.

    I don't picture a cold attacking me. It makes sense to me to think of a virus attacking my system, but not "me". I may be wrong, but I think in general in American English we don't characterize colds, fevers, or viruses as attacking us. A virus might be attacking my immune system, which results in a fever.

    "The fever attacked me in the morning" sounds a little humorous. I think it's just because we don't have the same mental image of fever.
     

    shrek99

    New Member
    English Australia
    JamesM makes a very good point, it does rather personalise the fever to say it 'attacked' or as I suggested to be 'taken by' a fever. Maybe...My body was attacked by the onset of fever. Are we trying to sound professional here or is it more a question of style?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top