Few people even have a phone in the house anymore.

marcogaiotto

Senior Member
Italian
Few people even have a phone in the house anymore.

Hello! Can you help me, please? What about "even" here? How would you translate it into Italian?
The sentece comes a short passage about the changes in household objects; they say people used to have rotary dial telephones to make call, while, at present, cell phones have reached each family, and you can do almost everything with them.
Poche persone hanno ancora/persino un telefono a casa.
Thanks a lot in advance!
 
Last edited:
  • marcogaiotto

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Nowadays, you can do almost all the things connected to communication from the palm of your hand. Few people even have a phone in the house anymore.

    Ho aggiunto la frase che precede e, come suggerimento, "anymore" viene tradotto con "non più".
    Non mi è chiaro:
    Solo poche persone non hanno più un telefono.
    What would you suggest? Thanks a lot once again!
     

    marcogaiotto

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Families used to place their rotary dial telephone either on the wall or on some piece of furniture that used to have a drawer containing two other disappearing household objects - Yellow Pages and the phone book. Dialling was a different experience since people used to form the number theywere calling by using the rotary wheel. Nowadays, you can do almost all the things connected to communication from the palm of your hand. Few people even have a phone in the house anymore.

    Ho aggiunto un altro pezzo del testo per chiarire.
    Se togliessi "anymore", il significato cambierebbe? Scusate, ma non riesco a comprendere come rendere "even" e "anymore"...E'chiaro che non si tratta di tradurre parola per parola...Ma, dato che il libro traduce "anymore" con "non più",
    non capisco come rendere la frase.
    Do you still think the same as before now that I have reported another passage of the text? Thanks a lot for your help!
     

    Tellure

    Senior Member
    Italian
    "Sono rimasti in pochi ormai..."?
    Oppure
    "Quasi nessuno ormai ha più la linea telefonica fissa a casa".
    Oppure
    "Quasi più nessuno ha ormai...".

    Il senso è quello, non mi fossilizzerei sui singoli termini.

    Edit:
    Magari ti è più chiaro così:

    "La gente non ha più nemmeno (o nemmeno più? 🤔) la linea telefonica fissa a casa ormai".

    Solo per rendere più esplicito il senso di "even" e "anymore", non è un suggerimento di traduzione, quest'ultimo.

    Se togliessi "anymore", il significato cambierebbe? Scusate, ma non riesco a comprendere come rendere "even" e "anymore"...E'chiaro che non si tratta di tradurre parola per parola...Ma, dato che il libro traduce "anymore" con "non più"
    Serve a distinguere la situazione attuale rispetto al passato e quindi non lo puoi togliere.

    Ma il libro come traduce tutta la frase?

    Per quanto riguarda "even", significa "ancora", o "nemmeno".
    Dipende se rendi la frase in forma affermativa o negativa. Credo che la tua confusione derivi da questo.

    Edit:

    Ricorda, inoltre, che "few" in inglese ha sempre una sfumatura negativa.

    Provo a cambiare la frase:

    "People don't even have a phone in the house anymore".

    L'ho resa completamente negativa, e ora penso sia più lampante il senso di "even" e "anymore".
     
    Last edited:

    marcogaiotto

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Serve a distinguere la situazione attuale rispetto al passato e quindi non lo puoi togliere.

    Ma il libro come traduce tutta la frase?

    Per quanto riguarda "even", significa "ancora", o "nemmeno".
    Dipende se rendi la frase in forma affermativa o negativa. Credo che la tua confusione derivi da questo.

    Edit:

    Ricorda, inoltre, che "few" in inglese ha sempre una sfumatura negativa.
    Il libro non traduce il testo, fornisce solo qualche suggerimento relativo ad alcuni termini. Grazie mille!
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I was thinking of nemmeno, persino also. The "even" added for emphasis, refers to the communication capabilities that fit in the palm of your hand in the sentence that precedes this one. It's a very conversational way of writing.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Nope, don't agree. 😊This is a nasty US habit. 🤣
    Is it one word or two? | Lexico.com

    The tendency to join two-word expressions together seems especially strong in the US. It's standard practice to write underway, anymore, or someday as one word in American English, for example, whereas the two-word forms are still the norm in British English:

    US EnglishBritish English
    Plans for next year's project are already underway.By October, the work was well under way.
    I know someday my whole family will be together.I would love to return to Australia some day.
    We don't even think about it anymore.I really don't like him any more.
     

    Flaviam88

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I was thinking of nemmeno, persino also. The "even" added for emphasis, refers to the communication capabilities that fit in the palm of your hand in the sentence that precedes this one. It's a very conversational way of writing.
    I vote for nemmeno or neanche
     
    Top