fifteen of the seventy-five-thousand-pound prize money

LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
we invested fifteen of the seventy-five-thousand-pound prize money to help secure our future. Google Page

Dear all,

Since almost all the sites on the first Google page are Chinese, I strongly suspect the sentence in question is incorrect because it may mean fifteen pounds or fifteen thousand pounds. Could you please explain to me? Thanks


LQZ
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's a term I just made up (sorry) to indicate that a particular unit of currency is being used in a particular conversation.

    The last house I bought was $435,000, but this one was only 32. (Thousand)
    I put $54 million of my own money into this company but the last time I looked it was worth 135. (Million)

    Once you've established the numbers -- often thousands or millions -- you're working with, you can use conversational shorthand after that.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It may be my more leisurely manner (we like not to rush things around here) but I would repeat the "thousand" or other unit in these examples.
    ... fifteen thousand of the seventy-five thousand pound prize...

    The thread title looks very odd to me.
    (Not only because thousand was written as shousand :))
     
    Last edited:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I was going to say that it sounded American to me, but then I looked at the Google page and found that it's from an IELTS exam. And from their webpage, I find that IELTS is the International English Language Testing System, the world’s proven English language test. IELTS is jointly managed by British Council, IDP: IELTS Australia and the University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations (Cambridge ESOL) through more than 500 locations in 130 countries.
     

    abenr

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It may be my more leisurely manner (we like not to rush things around here) but I would repeat the "thousand" or other unit in these examples.
    ... fifteen thousand of the seventy-five thousand pound prize...

    The thread title looks very odd to me.
    You could not be more right. Yes, the "thousand" should be repeated. Do anything you can to help the reader is good practice.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    There is no doubt that repeating the "thousand" is more helpful.

    But, on the other hand, the author would not have bothered to make grand statements about investing the princely amount of fifteen dollars, if that was the case. And I doubt that this is the kind of money that could secure anybody's future anyway :)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It seems to me that LQZ's initial doubt was justified and that the statement is slightly ambiguous. "Fifteen of the 75-thousand-pound prize money" isn't quite right grammatically, either: dropping what functions as a hyphenated compound adjective, you get "fifteen of the money". I think you have to say either "15,000 pounds" (with the rest left as it is) or "15,000 of the 75,000 pounds in prize money".
     
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