fill three glasses three-fourths with cabbage juice

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Thùy Trang

New Member
Vietnamese
Hi guys, nice to meet you!!!
Can I ask you some questions? Actually one question that I'm wondering. I saw on the internet and they wrote:"...was used to fill three glasses three-fourths with cabbage juice". If I change the position of "three-fourths" like this:"...was used to fill three-fourths three glasses with cabbage juice, will the meaning or grammar is correct?
Many thanks for your help!!!
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'Three fourths of three glasses' sounds like you have to do mental arithmetic: that's nine fourths, that's two and a quarter* glasses. Do you mean two and a quarter glasses? Can it be two full glasses, and a third glass that is one quarter full?

    In the original, it is more clear that you fill three glasses the same way: up to the three-quarters mark.

    * BrE uses 'quarter' for the fraction; AmE uses both words.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I find the original phrasing a little confusing.
    In BE we usually say "three-quarters".

    Based on the common expressions "to half-fill" or "quarter-fill" a receptacle, I'd think I'd use "three-quarters fill"
    (Something) was used to three-quarters fill three glasses with cabbage juice.

    fill the glass 1/4 up??
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I find the original phrasing a little confusing.
    In BE we usually say "three-quarters".
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
    If sticking with the original word order, I'd also add "full", despite "fill" occurring the first half, and would be tempted to change "with" to "of":
    ...was used to fill three glasses three-quarters full of cabbage juice

    After all, we wouldn't say "fill three glasses half with cabbage juice".
     
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