Final letters exception

leslangues13

Member
Italian - Roma
Hey there,

I saw many times the words like ראפ, וואטסאפ with the final letter in the normal form instead of its final form. I was wondering if there's a rule for it? Is it something for the foreign words? If so, every foreign word can be transcribed without the final form of the letters?

Thank you in advance.
 
  • Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    Basically it's become the custom that a "p" sound at the end of a word is written פ and not ף. So when you see ף, it is always "f".

    The reason for this is simply because in native Hebrew words, there is almost never a "p" at the end of a word. There is one time in the entire Tanach that there is a ףּ with a dot in it (Proverbs 30:6).
     

    leslangues13

    Member
    Italian - Roma
    Ah, I see, so it's a specific case for ף and not for the final letters as ם/ן/ך etc. Thank you for responding, it will help me even with the prononciation of native Hebrew words. I didn't know that they never end with p sound.
     

    Abaye

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Ah, I see, so it's a specific case for ף and not for the final letters as ם/ן/ך etc.
    The issue is only with letters that have special form and also different pronunciation at end of word. Therefore ך and ף.

    "P" sound at and of word is commonly transliterated as פ.

    For "k" there's a natural Modern Hebrew alternative, ק, which sounds like כ so is usually used to transliterate final "k". Yet when etymological spelling is important, e.g. for Semitic names, you may see כ at final position. For example Mubarak (the former Egyptian president) may be spelled מובארכ.

    כ"ף ופ"א כפופות בסופי מילים - האקדמיה ללשון העברית
     

    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    Though ךּ with a dot is actually fairly common in Biblical Hebrew. I occurs frequently when used as a verbal object, and with certain prepositions, and with certain verb forms like ויבך. But I believe none of these things remain common in Modern Hebrew.
     
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