final unstressed vowels

Dan2

Senior Member
US
English (US)
Continuing the Deutsche/Deutscher thread, but on a more general level:

Some words (most or all of foreign origin) end in an unstressed -a: Katarina (Name), Alabama (US-Bundesstaat), Margarita (Getränk).
Is this -a different from both -e and -er? (I realize the answer will depend on dialect.)

Anders gesagt, wenn jemand den Namen "Rota" hätte, würde die Aussprache davon anders sein, als von "rote" und "roter"?
 
  • berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    A final -a and -er produce a Schwa sound which is more open than the normal Schwa. These two Schwas are called a-Schwa and e-Schwa respectively. I.e.:
    Rota, roter = [ʁo:tɐ] (a-Schwa)
    Rote = [ʁo:tə] (e-Schwa)
    The difference is phonemic in German.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    "Rota" and "Rote" is definitely different.

    In case of "Rota" and "roter" it is very near, but in my area it is different.
    In "Roter" there is an "e-Schwa" followed by an "a-Schwa". The "e-Schwa" is very short, however, and when speaking fast, there is almost no difference. Also the "r" is sometimes pronounced itself, but very weak - except in exaggerated speech, for example in poetry where it is fully pronounced sometimes for comic effects.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Most modern dictionaries (e.g. here) transcribe unvoiced final -er as a single [-ɐ], indistinguishable from final unvoiced -a. I think this reflects the reality of modern Standard German.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Even if they are indistinguishable - it seems to be different to me. May be it depends on the letters behind it. I listened now how my colleagues spoke it, and they spoke it in different ways, depending on speed, on consonants or vowels following or preceding it. Maybe I filter it different.
     
    Last edited:

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    The diphthong pronunciation certainly exists. And if you ask a native speaker to pronounce "roter" you will certainly hear it; you might even hear a "proper" "r". But the same person would probably pronounce it differently when saying the word in a context of a sentence and without knowing which word you are after.
     

    Sidjanga

    Senior Member
    German;southern tendencies
    For me, too, there's a clear difference between roter and Rota.

    They may both be a-schwas, but in the case of Rota, the sound is clearly more open than it is with roter.

    Equally, you don't say "Agater", "Roser" or "Natascher" to women called Agata, Rosa or Natascha, respectively.
    I'm sure that, if you did, they - and probably everyone else, too - would note the difference.
     
    Last edited:

    SwissTom

    Member
    German - Switzerland & Germany
    For me, too, there's a clear difference between roter and Rota.

    They may both be a-schwas, but in the case of Rota, the sound is clearly more open than it is with roter.

    Equally, you don't say "Agater", "Roser" or "Natascher" to women called Agata, Rosa or Natascha, respectively.
    I'm sure that, if you did, they - and probably everyone else, too - would note the difference.
    Yes, exactly.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Equally, you don't say "Agater", "Roser" or "Natascher" to women called Agata, Rosa or Natascha, respectively.
    Of course not. My point was that you never say -er but always -a except in very articulate pronunciation. It is in my view the same as with double consonants: We all know that doesn't have them (except in constructs like "am Meer") yet most people would tell you they pronounce "nennen" as "nen-nen" although in natural speech they of course say "ne-nen".
     

    SwissTom

    Member
    German - Switzerland & Germany
    Dan2 - Ihr Deutsch ist schon so gut, der einfachste Weg Ihre Fragen zu beantworten, wäre Ihren nächsten Urlaub in Deutschland zu verbringen!
     

    SwissTom

    Member
    German - Switzerland & Germany
    You are aware that Swiss phonology is different? Not only in Dialect but also in Swiss Standard German. Swiss tend to pronounce a proper consonantal "r" even at the end of the word.
    Natürlich! Was ich schreibe bezieht sich immer auf die (hoch)deutsche Sprache.

    Edit: Ich denke jemand aus Hamburg würde die Endungen klarer betonen als jemand aus dem Schwabenland. Aber Schweizerdeutsch ist natürlich etwas anderes, es ist ja eigentlich kein Deutsch. Das weiss ich schon ... !
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I can really hear a difference between "Natascha" or "Kascha" - and "lascher" for example. This is true at least for my region or the region of my parents.

    I hear a difference, even if "er" is spoken as "a" in lax speech.
     

    Dan2

    Senior Member
    US
    English (US)
    The situation sounds similar to that regarding -a vs -er in English. In standard British English and in the standard German that Berndf is describing, they are identical.
    As soon as you leave the standard, you find dialects that maintain a distinction.

    Dialects can be more conservative than the standard!

    der einfachste Weg Ihre Fragen zu beantworten, wäre Ihren nächsten Urlaub in Deutschland zu verbringen!
    Lieber würde ich die Fonetik des Schweizerdeutsch vor Ort studieren (wenn nur die Schweiz nicht so teuer wäre...).
    (Man liest von Sextourismus; gibt es Fonetik-Tourismus?)

    Einmal hörte ich ein Lied (ist es wohlbekannt?) mit den Zeilen:
    ...Auf'n Himalaya
    ...Gibt's ka' Mehrwertsteuer
    Jetzt weiß ich, dass -a mit -er ein zulässiger Reim ist, aber -aya mit -euer? (Man singt "Mehrwertsteier". Was für ein Dialekt ist das?)
     

    SwissTom

    Member
    German - Switzerland & Germany
    Einmal hörte ich ein Lied (ist es wohlbekannt?) mit den Zeilen:
    ...Auf'n Himalaya
    ...Gibt's ka' Mehrwertsteuer
    Jetzt weiß ich, dass -a mit -er ein zulässiger Reim ist, aber -aya mit -euer? (Man singt "Mehrwertsteier". Was für ein Dialekt ist das?)
    A very strong Austrian or Bavarian accent. Haha ;) where did you hear it?
     

    evanovka

    Senior Member
    German - Bavaria
    ...Auf'n Himalaya
    ...Gibt's ka' Mehrwertsteuer
    Oh, this is great (and probably untrue) :D
    (btw, to make the rime work, it must be a very typically Bavarian (or old-fashioned?) Himal'aya instead of stdn. German Him'alaya, and it should be auf'[a]m)

    In general, I agree with the guys insisting on hearing something strange in Natascher and Bäcka. But to make rimes, sometimes you have to force it ;)
    I know there is another singer (from the north... but I don't get the name) who loves to sing in -aaaa instead of -er... sounds unique.
     

    Sidjanga

    Senior Member
    German;southern tendencies
    My point was that you never say -er but always -a except in very articulate pronunciation.
    Sorry to disagree, but I disagree. :)

    "Bäcka" is the way children talk. To them, "ein rota [roter] Schal" and "Rota" are the same. For adults normally not. The difference isn't big, of course, but it's there.
    I've just tried it again, and my impression is that that difference is even bigger - i.e., that the Bäcker schwa sound is even more closed - if you speak fast, i.e. if you do not pay much attention to clear pronuncation.

    Maybe there are regional differences though.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    "Bäcka" is the way children talk. To them, "ein rota [roter] Schal" and "Rota" are the same. For adults normally not. The difference isn't big, of course, but it's there.
    According to some self-proclaimed sole High/Standard German speakers from Lower Saxony/Hanover it's perfectly ok. :D
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    There are regional accents which realize -er differently. E.g Hessian realizes it as [-ɛ( : )] and "Wasser" is pronounced ['ʋazɛ( : )]. The best reference for Standard German today is probably what you hear on national TV channels. They are very careful to use a pronunciation with minimal regional marking yet does not sound bookish. I did browse through a few channels and counted less than 10% of -er endings which were different from [-ɐ] and the pronunciations of "Wasser" was always ['ʋasɐ].
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Sorry to disagree, but I disagree. :)

    "Bäcka" is the way children talk. To them, "ein rota [roter] Schal" and "Rota" are the same. For adults normally not. The difference isn't big, of course, but it's there.
    I've just tried it again, and my impression is that that difference is even bigger - i.e., that the Bäcker schwa sound is even more closed - if you speak fast, i.e. if you do not pay much attention to clear pronuncation.

    Maybe there are regional differences though.
    That would be so, if you pronounced a final -a as [-a( : )] rather than [-ɐ]. Maybe you are thinking of Fieda being pronounced as [fʁi:da( : )]. This pronunciation is standard only in pausa as in "Und dann rief er: Frida!". The ordinary pronunciation as in "Frida stellte ihm das Essen auf den Tisch" is [fʁi:dɐ].
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Dann korrigiert mich bitte wenn ich zu sehr "schweizere"! Tom
    Eigentlich ist Eure Art -er auszusprechen ja sogar "richtiger". Sie ist zumindest näher an der Bühnenaussprache.:D Jetzt mal im ernst: Die drei nationalen Varianten des Standarddeutschen halte ich für durchaus gleichwertig. Es war mein Fehler, nicht darauf hingewiesen zu haben, auf welche der drei Standards sich meine Antwort bezog.:eek:
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Einmal hörte ich ein Lied (ist es wohlbekannt?) mit den Zeilen:
    ...Auf'n Himalaya
    ...Gibt's ka' Mehrwertsteuer
    Jetzt weiß ich, dass -a mit -er ein zulässiger Reim ist, aber -aya mit -euer? (Man singt "Mehrwertsteier". Was für ein Dialekt ist das?)
    Ein schönes Beispiel, aber halt nur gültig in Österreich und Bayern - sonst reimt sich das nicht. :)

    In Österreich ist meiner Meinung nach auch ganz bestimmt kein Unterschied zwischen "echtem" auslautendem unbetontem /-a/ und einem auslautenden "-er", das zu /-a/ wird: beides ist mehr oder weniger [ɐ].
    "Rota" und "Roter" lauten in Österreich umgangssprachlich gleich (auch das "o" ist in beiden Fällen halblang; unterschieden wird lediglich in jenen Dialekten, wo das "o" einen Lautwandel durchmacht - in "rot" zu "rout" oder "reot" oder "roit", aber das betrifft dann natürlich nicht den auslautenden Vokal). :)
    Es kann aber sein, dass ausgebildete österreichische Sprecher in Standardsprache einen Unterschied zwischen "Rota" und "Roter" machen - nicht im Auslaut (der auch da, meiner Meinung nach, selbst bei Nachrichtensprechern gleich ist und sich reimt), sondern beim Plosiv, der vielleicht bei "Rota" überartikuliert (behaucht) wird (da Fremdwort), bei "Roter" dagegen nicht.
    Eventuell würden auch Dialektsprecher "Rota" mit Geminata oder Fortis (je nach Auffassung der Sprachbeschreibung) aussprechen, "Roter" dagegen mit einfachem Vokal: auch da wäre der Unterschied also wenn schon dann nicht im auslautenden Vokal.

    Was die Standardsprache in Deutschland betrifft, gibt der Duden für "Rota" Aussprache mit volltonigem [a] an (also nicht mit Schwa, im Gegensatz zu "Roter"): ob das aber wirklich so gesprochen wird (bzw. wenn, in welchen Regionen), vermag ich nicht zu beurteilen. :)
    Laut Duden Aussprachewörterbuch wäre also theoretisch ein Unterschied bei auslautendem /-a/ (bei "Rota/Roter"), der mir aber persönlich noch nie aufgefallen ist (und den es in Österreich sicherlich nicht gibt).
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Was die Standardsprache in Deutschland betrifft, gibt der Duden für "Rota" Aussprache mit volltonigem [a] an (also nicht mit Schwa, im Gegensatz zu "Roter"): ob das aber wirklich so gesprochen wird (bzw. wenn, in welchen Regionen), vermag ich nicht zu beurteilen. :)
    Ich würde vermuten wie in meinem Beispiel mit "Frida": In Pausa existiert ein ein praktisch wahrnehmbarer Unterschied, sonst nicht.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top