Financially acute

kaaskaa

Senior Member
Polish
Hello,

I was wondering whether 'financially acute' is a collocation? Or it would not be intelligible to native speakers?

Regards,
Kasia
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Perhaps I was too hasty ... usually I search first, but I didn't this time. "Financially acute" seems to be more common than I had imagined. I see this definition of acute: very sharp in intellect, insight, or perception. (WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English.)

    Then I checked Google for "financially acute" and found 315 actual results (fairly high), with most of the ones I looked at appearing fairly reasonable ... so it appears that it's a collocation for some people. :)
     

    kaaskaa

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thanks for getting back to me. Although I've made a literal translation from Polish to English, it still made sense to me. Would you say that the phrase could be used in the following sentence?

    ''We've moved in together because living separately would be much more financially acute'. ?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would never use it that way, no. Even the logic is wrong, I'm afraid.

    We've moved in together because it made much more financial sense than living separately.
     

    tehtmc

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    "Acute" does not fit in the context.
    You could use "uneconomical" or "financially taxing".

    A better way to put it is "to have financial acumen", if you want to talk about being "financially acute".
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    When and how would you use financially acute then?
    I thought I'd made it clear that I would never use it. :) But if you want to see how others use it, just put financially acute in the Search box at the top of the page, and then click the "in context" link to see how people use it in context.
     
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