find it difficult

Carol89

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
When a person finds something difficult, what does it mean? Is this phrase "find it difficult" common in the US? Does it exist?
 
  • almufadado

    Senior Member
    Português de Portugal
    When a person finds something difficult, what does it mean? Is this phrase "find it difficult" common in the US? Does it exist?

    Means the person did not find it easy. Quer dizer que a pessoa não achou a coisa fácil.

    Is more a formal form, Americans usually find thing hard to do/see/.... in a informal way.

    The most common use is the noun - difficulty :
    [...]The difficulty is not on coming up new ideas,
    [...]The difficulty is... I’m afraid I don’t know what I’m doing
    [...]For others, the difficulty is not from the child; yet others consider that the child's difficulty is
     
    Last edited:

    Ricardoreis

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    To be precise, it means that for a certain person (the one who 'finds' it difficult), that thing is difficult. Though it may not be difficult for everyone. There is no formal/informal implication in tone, and there is no difference at all (as far as I am aware) in the use of this phrase in American/British English, and I disagree that there is any difference between "finding something difficult" or "finding something hard". They mean exactly the same and can be used interchangeably, in my understanding.

    For example:

    "Due to his lack of education, he found reading complicated books very difficult/hard"
    "Due to his extensive education, he found reading complicated books very easy/simple"


    See? Whether 'reading complicated books' is difficult or not depends on many things, and is different depending on the person.

    In contrast, you could say:

    "The job of being prime minister is difficult/hard and demanding"

    Meaning that everyone who does the job will find it difficult.

    Hope that makes some sense!
     

    almufadado

    Senior Member
    Português de Portugal
    There is no formal/informal implication in tone, and there is no difference at all (as far as I am aware) in the use of this phrase in American/British English, and I disagree that there is any difference between "finding something difficult" or "finding something hard".

    I did not said the sentences are different !

    The later embraces the other and much more. In context "To be hard to verb" it may be :

    • difficult (has complex operation),
    • problematic (arises problems or subsequent problems),
    • intricate (of delicate operation or difficult to analyze or understand),
    and so on ... all of this can be just replaces by the 2-syllable "hard to verb".

    I only implied that the use of "finding something hard to do" is more general and popular thous more informal. The example is television and their "mainstream language" where your wont ear "difficult to do" but rather "hard to do".

    By your reaction, i find i should rather say "more generalized".

    Besides "finding something hard" can mean more, in other contexts, that just being difficult. And We wont go futher ...:)
     

    Ricardoreis

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    Hehe, ok. Well, I can't speak for every English speaker around the world, I can only suggest the ways in which I, as a native, understand 'hard' and 'difficult' in this phrase.

    Personally speaking, I'm pretty sure I use both about as often as each other, and that I hear both about as often as each other, and to my mind they seem completely interchangeable in this phrase. After all, something that is 'problematic' and something that is 'intricate' can also be thought of as difficult, no?

    I don't want to split hairs, I just disagree a little with the complication in this instance.
     
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    amirebm

    Member
    Persian
    Hi guys
    Can "find something difficult" be used in formal writing? If no, please suggest a suitable one.
     
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