Finendo con il danneggiarsi

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Jarofsugar

New Member
Italian - Italy
Ciao a tutti,

sto traducendo in inglese un articolo sull'importanza delle fughe delle piastrelle.

Uno dei motivi per cui le fughe sono importanti è che danno uno spazio per i piccoli movimenti di assestamento. Il paragrafo originale dice:

Nonostante una posa fatta a regola d’arte, le piastrelle saranno comunque soggette a piccoli movimenti di assestamento. Le vie di fuga forniscono quindi uno spazio per tali movimenti. Senza fughe, le piastrelle premerebbero l’una contro l’altra, finendo con il danneggiarsi.

Il mio dubbio riguarda l'ultima frase, che ho tradotto così:

Without grouts, the tiles would press against each other and eventually be damaged.

Però quel "and eventually be damaged" proprio non mi suona.

Grazie mille!
 
  • TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Ciao,

    Without grout, the tiles would eventually rub against each other, causing damage.
    ..........................................................touch.........each.................

    "Grout" è singolare e plurale.
     

    AlabamaBoy

    Senior Member
    American English
    To answer your question Paul, there is a difference but a literal translation would sound a bit off at least to me unless there were a reason to emphasize the "line."
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    To answer your question Paul, there is a difference but a literal translation would sound a bit off at least to me unless there were a reason to emphasize the "line."
    Thanks.
    I see your point, however my problem is that the original text clearly mentions "grout lines", pointing out that if they are not wide enough the tiles might crack.
     

    sorry66

    Senior Member
    English, England
    To london,
    Yes, 'grouting' is a verb but it is also a general term used (perhaps loosely) for the ensemble of 'grout lines' (never used that term before (although, it's the obvious thing to say) around your tiles.
    Otherwise, grout could just refer to the paste in the pot.
    Look at the number of tripadvisor posts that refer to filthy, black or dirty 'grouting in the bathroom'.
    http://www.netmums.com/coffeehouse/...-tiles-getting-rid-black-mould-marks-all.html
    These ladies seem very concerned about the state of their grouting 'may your grouting always gleam to a perfect shine'.
    They use 'grout' and 'grouting' interchangeably.

    From the Oxford Dic. you also have: Grouting (noun) - Grout, especially when hardened.
     
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