Finite verbs

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cute angel

Senior Member
the universe
Goodafternoon to all of you;

I'll try this time to write a full context by which you can understand me easily.

We are studied FINITE & NONFINITE verbs I got the lesson but I have some doubt.

would you like to tell me if my following examples are true or not:

EX:

She is a doctor

She bought a new car.

In both examples the two verbs are finite because they indicate a simple tense.

Ex:2

She is playing tennis.

In this case the verb is not a finite verb but if we take *IS** we can say that it's finite.

This is my point of view about it.

So if it's wrong I hope you will correct me

I'm so gratful.

Regards
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    That seems to be correct. Finite verbs change for tense, person and number. Does the verb change if you change one of these?

    She is a doctor
    They are doctors
    He was a doctor

    Yes, it does, so it is finite.

    She is playing tennis:
    They are playing tennis
    He was playing tennis

    No, "playing" does not change, it's the present participle, which is non-finite. As you say "is" changes: this is the finite part of the compound verb.

    Other non-finite verbs are the infinitive and the past participle.
     

    cute angel

    Senior Member
    the universe
    Yes I understood now the difference

    But I want to know if modales are finite or not?

    I think they are finite because they change the form from the present to the past

    Regards
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I got the lesson but I have some doubts.

    I would you like to tell me if my following examples are true right or not:

    EX:

    She is a doctor

    She bought a new car.

    In both examples the two verbs are finite because they indicate a simple tense.:tick:

    Ex:2

    She is playing tennis.

    In this case the verb is not a finite verb but if we take *IS** we can say that it's finite.:warn:
    In your second example, you can speak of the compound verb, or the simple verbs which compose it:

    is: obviously finite
    playing: obviously non-finite
    is playing: finite (the present progressive tense), in my opinion

    Regards.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In my opinion, yes. It's a present tense, after all!
    But I am not a linguist or a grammarian.
     

    cute angel

    Senior Member
    the universe
    Thanks anyway

    I hope to see others participate in that topic

    Regards

    And I appreciate your help brother Outsider
     
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