Fiocco nascita

gino2010

New Member
italiano - Italia
Hello everyone!
I'm trying to translate the following sentence: Nei secoli passati il fiocco nascita era un amuleto per proteggere il nuovo nato....
In the past, the newborn ribbon (?) was considered a good luck charm which would protect the newborn...
I don't like the repetition (newborn), but I'm not even sure if fiocco nascita can be translated into newborn ribbon!
Aiuto!
grazie
 
  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    One way around this since I think it's culturally specific could be
    In the past newborns would be/were presented with a decorative bow/garland/wreath to protect against the evil eye.
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    The problem here is that "fiocchi nascita" (which can be pink or blue) are a distinctly Italian custom, which isn't used (at least, not in the US, and I suspect not in the UK, either).

    I suppose "birth wreath" would be the closest equivalent, however (personally) I like the sound of "garland" better. For one thing, wreaths are specifically round, whereas garland is more generic (wreaths are garlands; garlands don't have to be wreaths). And since "fiocco nascita" is usually in the form of a decorative bow, I think "garland" fits the bill better.

    p.s. Ron and I cross-posted. I was unable to find "birth garlands" on internet, but did find "birth birth decorations". But I like Ron's suggestion of explaining that it's an Italian custom.
     
    Wreaths in the UK are generally round and are associated with funerals. (Though, I must admit, also with Christmas!) If the "fiocco nascita" is not always round, I would go for "garland", but it's your choice.
     

    gino2010

    New Member
    italiano - Italia
    Thank you all so much! This was my first time posting a thread on WR and it was really very helpful.
    Especially the idea to look at the images on Google, thanks Mary49!
    Wreaths are in fact all round, and I do associate them with Christmas (or funerals), whereas in my mind garlands are used for announcements where a little pieces of paper or fabric with lettering on them spell out "it's a girl/boy" or such things. The problem does lay in the cultural specificity.
    Maybe Birth announcement bows?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I feel no obligation to agree with (or like) that translation. I vote for garlands (instead of wreaths) for all of the reasons stated in various previous posts.
    No one is forcing you to either agree or like the translation, curiosone. You may wish to contact that person on Pinterest and let them know your feelings on the subject! :D

    I actually agree with you that 'garland' sounds a lot better than 'wreath'. The latter sounds a bit funereal, as John has already pointed out. :)
     
    Last edited:

    furs

    Senior Member
    Italian
    May I just confirm -- from personal experience -- that this custom is totally unknown in the English-speaking world. I happened to walk past a few 'fiocchi' one day with a mixed group that included people from the UK, US, and Ireland. Nobody had any clue what those garlands represented.
     

    Holymaloney

    Senior Member
    English (UK) / Italian - bilingual
    Hi :)
    Just to add that I don't like wreath either (reminds me of funerals :() and would very definitely go with either birth bow or birth garland ;) @gino, let's see how you want to translate your sentence then ;)
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    May I just confirm -- from personal experience -- that this custom is totally unknown in the English-speaking world. I happened to walk past a few 'fiocchi' one day with a mixed group that included people from the UK, US, and Ireland. Nobody had any clue what those garlands represented.
    :thumbsup: Some migrants to English-speaking countries may still carry on the tradition, but it's the first time I've ever heard of them. :)
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    No one is forcing you to either agree or like the translation, curiosone. You may wish to contact that person on Pinterest and let them know your feelings on the subject! :D

    I actually agree with you that 'garland' sounds a lot better than 'wreath'. The latter sounds a bit funereal, as John has already pointed out. :)
    I think we all agree (here) that "wreath" is simply too funereal (? in Italian "funereo" :confused:) in English.

    I feel no obligation to contact anyone at Pinterest. My only concern is that the WR Forum database get it right.
    As a translator, I know how pressed one can get, to "wing" a hurried translation - as opposed to taking the time to get a really good one. Hopefully someone at Pinterest will (some day) consult us. ;)
     
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