first name, middle name, surname,last name, family name and other name

amrsnj

New Member
Tamil - English - Sinhala
hi members,
my name is : Ammar saneej
my fathers's name is : Mohammad Ismail

i always have the problem with the F,M,S,L names.
" Ammar Saneej" is what my name

if i want to write,

First name and Last name,
First Name and Surname
How should i write them?

please help me. i am awaiting to fill an application
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    In English, surname = last name.

    Example:
    Our president's first name is Barack. (I believe that this is also called forename in British English.)
    His middle name is Hussein.
    His last name, also called surname or family name, is Obama.
    His full name: Barack Hussein Obama.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    my name is : Ammar saneej
    my fathers's name is : Mohammad Ismail
    I googled "Tamil first and last names". The first article says Tamils do not normally have "surnames" (family names).

    English usage is that a person's 2-word "full name" is spoken and written in this order: "first name" then "surname" ("last name")l

    So for an application, I suggest you list "Ammar" as your first name and "Saneej" is your last name.

    If you do that, when people say both together (your "full name") they will say "Ammar Saneej", which is the correct order.

    With people you interact with at work or elsewhere, you just explain the correct Tamil usage, so they can address you properly.
     

    amrsnj

    New Member
    Tamil - English - Sinhala
    THANK YOU
    can i say like this ?
    first name : Ammar Saneej
    last name : Ismail
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    There are several terms in use. The first name is the given name as mentioned above. In Europe, you might also encounter forename or occasionally Christian name.

    The middle name is a term that is very common in North America, but in Europe it is more common to think about multiple given names.

    The last name is the surname, as mentioned above. You might also encounter the term family name.

    The problem of course is that you have a name in the format normal to Muslim and Hindu Tamils: given name + patronymic. To be able to cope with North American or European forms, you will probably have to treat your patronymic as your surname. It is possible to have a surname that consists of more than one word, such as the English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams (where his surname is Vaughan Williams). You can decide that your surname is Mohammad Ismail. You might also want to consider hyphenating that (Mohammad-Ismail).
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    You didn't say anything about "Ismail" in your first post.
    Yes he did.
    my fathers's name is : Mohammad Ismail
    The terminology used for names is a minefield for people who are not from countries which are English speaking and culturally Christian.
    I notice government documents say last name.
    What's a famous composer to do if visiting the USA? Like "Liszt Ferenc". His first name was Liszt, but his given name was Ferenc. His last name was Ferenc, but his surname or family name was Liszt. And that's from a Christian country where the combination "Christian name / Surname" might have been expected and which doesn't use patronymics with gender-specific endings.

    I think that is why British Government forms now consistently use "Given name(s)", "Family name" and "Any other names you are known by". Do you, amrsnj, have a passport? That should follow an international agreement and one could expect your government to have decided how names like yours should be recorded on passports.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I think surname is on the way out in the US. I notice government documents say last name.
    My tri-lingual U.S. passport says in English, "Surname" (singular) and "Given Names.";)

    Interestingly, the Spanish is apellidos (plural), reflecting the Hispanic tradition of dual surnames -- in which the "last name" is not the family name.
     
    Last edited:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It's his first post, RM1. I suppose you need to be aware that this means the name on his passport is probably Ammar Saneej Mohammad Ismail. Over here, we might try to make things clearer by inserting 'bin' or 's/o' (= son of) before Mohammad Ismail.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    It's his first post, RM1. I suppose you need to be aware that this means the name on his passport is probably Ammar Saneej Mohammad Ismail. Over here, we might try to make things clearer by inserting 'bin' or 's/o' (= son of) before Mohammad Ismail.
    Ah. Thank you.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    It's his first post, RM1. I suppose you need to be aware that this means the name on his passport is probably Ammar Saneej Mohammad Ismail. Over here, we might try to make things clearer by inserting 'bin' or 's/o' (= son of) before Mohammad Ismail.
    I've never seen "s/o" in that context, and would only have guessed that it stood for "significant other"!
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, local to Singapore. It is also used in Malaysia but the abbreviation based on the Malay language rather than English. I won't be surprised if this is also used in other places where there is a significant proportion of Tamils (in Southern India and Sri Lanka).
     
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