First seat/last seat

Can we use:
She is sitting on the first seat.[in the class on the first seat]
She is sitting on the last seat [in the class on the last seat]

Someone is asking me where my friend is sitting.
So is the use of"first and last"correct?
Thank you
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    It might make sense in a context where all of the seats were numbered, and both parties to the conversation were familiar with the system. To an AE speaker, accustomed to US classrooms, the term means nothing.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No. You’d still have to explain what kind of seating you meant. And if one person was on the first and the other on the last chair in a row, a more logical way of saying that would be to describe them as sitting or seated “at either end of the row”.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    So it now seems you don’t mean a row of chairs as you said before — you mean a long bench on which a number of people are sitting.

    You could say: She’s sitting at one end of the bench. But in order to explain which end, you’d have to add more information. For example: She’s sitting at the window end of the bench.
     
    Doesn't"bench"mean chair.
    But the use of bench in your sentence is giving me a feeling that it is being used for the whole row instead of one chair . Am I right?
    You could say: She’s sitting at one end of the bench. But in order to explain which end, you’d have to add more information. For example: She’s sitting at the window end of the bench
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If there is one row is going side to side or front to back?

    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

    or

    _
    _
    _
    _
    _
    _

    If it's front to back you could say first seat and last seat. But if it's side to side there is no first and last. They are all equal. It's just one end or the other.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Now, just the use of the words first and last.

    Abcd evidently thought a bench was the same as a chair, which it isn’t. So I’m now assuming the seating consists of a row of separate chairs, side by side (probably with more rows behind).

    As Florentia pointed out way back in #2, only if the seats were numbered would it be obvious which one was considered the first – in other words, which end you’re supposed to start counting them from.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Chair does not appear in the opening post. I don't think it is crucial. You could have a bench or a pew, or chairs arranged in rows as in a cinema or concert hall. As others have said, it won't be clear which seat is 'first' and which is 'last'. If you use rightmost or leftmost (or first from the right/left etc) in this arrangement, the meaning will be clear.
     
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