fish(a coin out, out a coin)

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Mr.Naom

Senior Member
Spanish
Greetings,

In General, when we use some phrasal verb such as "fish out"
where is the best place to put the object? between parts of the verb? or after all the parts?

Which of these is the best?
1- He fished out a coin from his pocket.
2- He fished a coin out from his pocket.


Thanks
 
  • Archilochus

    Senior Member
    American English
    Copyright's 3 is the more usual in my experience. I'm hesitant to say what the general "rule" is, though. For example, consider the pv "to pass up". I don't think anyone would ever say, "He passed the opportunity up to go to Barcelona." As with many things in English, it depends....
     
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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    More often than not, I place the object between the two parts of a phrasal verb, but that depends on the phrasal verb you're asking about and what the object of that verb is: I held up a liquor store. That man just held me up after I was nice enough to give him change for a twenty-dollar bill.

    I'd be inclined to place "a coin" between "fished" and "out".
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    In general, there is no preference. Both are commonly used. The exception is with pronouns: these need to be before the preposition (I fished it out; he held me up).
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    That sounds reasonable, ETB, but I still have a strong preference for the middle position of an object named "Mr Brown" in a sentence that uses "hold up": That bastard held Mr. Brown up after Brown went out of his way to change a twenty-dollar bill for him. "Held up Mr Brown" sounds much less likely to me in that sentence.

    I don't have a list of separable and inseparable phrasal verbs with me at the moment, but I'll bet that there are quite a few other separable phrasal verbs that I would have some strong preference about -- a preference based on nothing more than my ear and my memory of what people say in real conversations.
     
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