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keytosuccess

Member
Korean
When I see the title of an article, I think that there must be a big accident.

However, now that I read the acticle, I find that the title is excessive.

In this case, here in Korea, we informally say that the journalist fish for me. (--> 낚시하다 in Korean. It can be translated into 'fishing' or 'hooking' )

Here is one more example.

In a TV series, some clues seem to tell us that the conclusion is going to this way.

However, actually the conclusion goes to that way.

In this case, we also say that the writer fish for us.

Do you have a slang that is used in the similar way?
 
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  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I guess "misleading".

    The title of the article is misleading you.
    The writer is misleading you.

    We also say "leading you astray".
    The title of the article leads you astray.
    The writer is leading you astray.

    Is it "fishing for you" in Korean, or "letting you fish for it"? It's interesting. :)
     

    keytosuccess

    Member
    Korean
    I guess "misleading".

    The title of the article is misleading you.
    The writer is misleading you.

    We also say "leading you astray".
    The title of the article leads you astray.
    The writer is leading you astray.

    Is it "fishing for you" in Korean, or "letting you fish for it"? It's interesting. :)
    Hi, perpend.
    Thank you! ^^
    We say the writer is fishing for us. ^^a

    I found some other expressions.
    Can 'play a trick on' or 'pick up' be used in this situation?

    For example,
    The title played a trick on me. The title picked me up.

    What do you think?
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Hmmm ... maybe "the title drew/reeled/lured me in". (This is like fishing in AmE.)

    It was clever, but then I realized, it wasn't what I thought it was going to be.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    In English, if we say someone is 'fishing', we often mean that they are fishing for a compliment, etc. ('When she showed me her new curtains, it was clear that she was fishing for a compliment.')

    Perpend offers good options (post 5) and they work for me.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Working my way around my earlier statement about "hooking" ...

    You could say the title is being used as a hook. It is a hook.

    You could say: This title is fishing for readers.

    Perpend's and natkretep's suggestion are good.
     
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