fissare l'incontro a qualsiasi ora della giornata

PANuccia

New Member
Italiano
Ciao a tutti,

ho un dubbio su come rendere correttamente, in inglese, la seguente espressione:

"Si senta libero di fissare l'incontro a qualsiasi ora della giornata"

posto che il giorno è già stato fissato, in inglese è meglio renderla:

"Please, feel free to schedule anytime" ----> è incompleta, secondo voi? oppure:

"Please, feel free to schedule anytime during the day".

altri suggerimenti? :)

Il tono è formale ma non troppo.
Grazie mille! ;)
 
  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    What does "l'incontro" refer to exactly? A little loose could be
    We are available to meet anytime during the day, please let us/me know what works for you.
     

    jchap27

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Ciao!

    Posto che il giorno è già stato fissato, direi:

    Please feel free to schedule the meeting anytime of the day.
    Più informale: Feel free to schedule our meeting whenever.

    Spero di auitarti! Buona giornata.
     

    PANuccia

    New Member
    Italiano
    What does "l'incontro" refer to exactly? A little loose could be
    We are available to meet anytime during the day, please let us/me know what works for you.

    rrose17, in this case "l'incontro" stands for a work meeting.

    Thank you for your suggestion!
     

    Lorena1970

    Banned
    Italy, Italiano
    Faccio un'obiezione di forma: se è un incontro di lavoro, credo sia ovvio si svolga durante il giorno. Io in genere dico " Please feel free to arrange the meeting anytime at your convenience" / "We are available anytime, please feel free to arrange the meeting at your convenience"
     

    zipp404

    Senior Member
    Bilingual English|Español
    Faccio un'obiezione di forma: se è un incontro di lavoro, credo sia ovvio si svolga durante il giorno. Io in genere dico " Please feel free to arrange the meeting anytime at your convenience" / "We are available anytime, please feel free to arrange the meeting at your convenience"
    Scusa, ma la frase non è ben formulata.

    To 'arrange a metting' significa fare i preparativi necessari per una reunione.

    Si usa il verbo 'to schedule' per accentuare l'idea dell'ora speficica della riunione:

    Please feel free to schedule the meeting at a time that is convenient to you.
    We are available to meet anytime. Please feel free to schedule the meeting at a time that is convenient to you.

    Spero esservi stao utile.
     
    Quote: "To 'arrange a metting' significa fare i preparativi necessari per una reunione.

    Si usa il verbo 'to schedule' per accentuare l'idea dell'ora speficica della riunione".

    That is true, but just to say that if you use "for" instead of "at" after "arrange", it has the same sense and there is no risk of ambiguity: "Please feel free to arrange the meeting for any time...". You could also use "for" after "schedule": "...schedule the meeting for any time...".
     

    Lorena1970

    Banned
    Italy, Italiano
    Scusa, ma la frase non è ben formulata. Davvero?

    To 'arrange a metting' meeting significa fare i preparativi necessari per una reunione. Temo proprio di no. O comunque non solo.
    Sender's email: I write you to propose a meeting at your office in XXX , possibly on a Friday at the end of October (24th or 31st at your convenience)
    Addresse's reply ( un architetto MADRELINGUA BE di chiara fama. Vuoi nome e cognome…??? Vuoi la copia originale…? No problem): "XXXwill arrange a date for us. "

    Forse che "si organizza/ si fanno i preparativi per" una data…
    :eek:

    To schedule significa "mettere in agenda / pianificare" ed è un termine estremamente formale oltre che alquanto in disuso, in UK almeno, per gli appuntamenti di lavoro. Forse i bancari ancora lo usano. :rolleyes:

    In 10 anni di collaborazione con professionisti inglesi, e non proprio con gli ultimi arrivati, NESSUNO mi ha mai detto "We have scheduled the meeting….etc.etc." Giuro, NESSUNO.

    PS: "I write you" è informale perché ci si conosce piuttosto bene…Tanto per evitare malintesi

     
    Last edited:

    catspanish

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    If this is an informal statement (e.g. an email) then I would say it does not really matter. Schedule is absolutely fine as a word. Working in accountancy in the private and public sectors and dealing with CEOs and board members, the important thing is to get the message across clearly to very busy people. Although all suggestions above are valid and interesting, my view is just send the email. For what it is worth, I would write: "Any time that day is good for us, let us know what suits" Which is along the lines of Lorena1970.

    That's what I used to write anyway to my contacts during my business career
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    We have a BrE/AmE difference here. In BrE there's nothing wrong with "arrange", meaning fix a time. To me "arrange a meeting" doesn't mean the same as "make the arrangements for a meeting".

    "Schedule a meeting" is probably more AmE in origin, but nowadays it sounds fine in BrE too.
     

    Lorena1970

    Banned
    Italy, Italiano
    If this is an informal statement (e.g. an email) then I would say it does not really matter. Schedule is absolutely fine as a word. Working in accountancy in the private and public sectors and dealing with CEOs and board members, the important thing is to get the message across clearly to very busy people. Although all suggestions above are valid and interesting, my view is just send the email. For what it is worth, I would write: "Any time that day is good for us, let us know what suits" Which is along the lines of Lorena1970.

    That's what I used to write anyway to my contacts during my business career
    Of course I agree :) There may be many slightly different ways, and the important thing is to get the message across.
    I have nothing against the use of "to schedule" (which sounds to me more AE than BE, for what in my experience), although it really never happened to me to use it or to hear it used with me, even dealing with engineers. What got me a bit nervous with were the peremptory statements "To arrange means….." followed by "to schedule must be used…." :eek:. That's it!:)


    EDIT: Voilà, Einstein has just come in to specify what I was convinced of.:D
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    We have a BrE/AmE difference here. In BrE there's nothing wrong with "arrange", meaning fix a time. To me "arrange a meeting" doesn't mean the same as "make the arrangements for a meeting".

    "Schedule a meeting" is probably more AmE in origin, but nowadays it sounds fine in BrE too.
    Let's disect this further.

    For me, if I hear or say :

    "Arrange a meeting for tomorrow", it means "Contact the people involved and invite them/get their confirmation" = "Organizza una riunione per domani"

    "Arrange the time for a meeting tomorrow", it means "Contact the people involved and get them to agree on a specific time" = "Vedi a che ora si puo' fare la riunione"

    "Schedule a meeting for tomorrow, any time you want" , it means "Set the time and let everybody know" (consensus-building is not so important)
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Well I guess it's AE/BE then since I'm with Ody and I guess zipp on this one. To arrange a meeting, to me, would mean to make the necessary arrangements for a meeting, i.e. involve others.
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I think that probably the distinction is blurred because normally no one would schedule a meeting without some kind of consultation. But if "arrange" for the North American ear necessarily suggests a lot of organisational work I can understand your objection.:)
     

    zipp404

    Senior Member
    Bilingual English|Español
    Sorry for the incorrect spelling of meeting (metting) and specifica (speficica ) in my post 6 above, it was a typing error that I inadvertetly made while responding to this post hurriedly on an ipad while getting ready to run on my treadmill. Scusate gli errori di tipografia.

    I am responding again because I think it's important to make a distinction between usage and meaning. Perhaps in BE the verb 'to arrange' is used to determine the time of a meeting and the usage in BE in that respect differs from the one in AE. I don't think that is the case, but let us suppose, it is.

    Be that as it may, words do have a fundamental meaning that is common to both BE and AE irrespective of one usage or another.

    'To arrange a meeting' means to plan various aspects of the meeting, including but not limited to determining, arbitrarily or through consulation and mutual accord, the date of the meeting. In this sense, the transitive use of "to arrange' has a broader meaning than the more restrictive meaning of the verb 'to schedule' which refers to determining the specific, precise time of a meeting or the timetable of a series of actions or events. 'To schedule a meeting" is to set the time it will take place. "To arrange a meeting" means muchmore than simply scheduling the time it will take place. "To arrange for the time of a meeting" implies coming to a consensus before settling the time, but only by virtue of the fact that the verb is intransitive and the noun "time' is used: to arrange for the time of a meeting.

    The difference in meaning is clear and independent of the usages, and it serves no purpose to privilege one usage and disparage another because of a presumed, false notion that usage defines meaning and that therefore one usage is inherently more businesslike or superior than the other.
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    Usage can actually change meaning over time, and nobody is disparaging usages here. Everyone is giving their opinion on what is said in their region, as they are entitled to do.

    I agree with all the other BE speakers - we use arrange to mean set a time. I would never talk about scheduling a meeting, and don't hear others using it either, although I wouldn't find it odd if I did hear it used. This sounds like a clear case of BE/ AE difference, regardless of the fact that arrange can mean more than setting a time, unlike schedule.
     
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