fit in the intonation of the standard speech.

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Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering whether it is idiomatic to say:

We need to find the appropriate and natural words which could fit in the intonation of the standard political speech.

Thoughts: I am going to explain why I write a speech this way by using the right and natural words which could be pronounced with high and low voice, as a result, composing the standard language that the political orators would use.
 
  • Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hello, my friends,

    I was wondering whether it is idiomatic to say:

    We need to find the appropriate and natural words which could fit in the intonation of the standard political speech.

    Thoughts: I am going to explain why I write a speech this way by using the right and natural words which could be pronounced with high and low voice, as a result, composing the standard language that the political orators would use.
    Do you mean it is acceptable but not idiomatic because it is wordy?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I confess, Sun, I don't really understand the concept you're trying to express. For me, a sentence would have a particular intonation pattern; a speech wouldn't.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I confess, Sun, I don't really understand the concept you're trying to express. For me, a sentence would have a particular intonation pattern; a speech wouldn't.
    I mean the speech needs to sound powerful and I think it concerns the intonation. And it might be a language style of a speech composed by many similar sentences with the same intonation pattern.
     
    I wonder if there is a confusion of the meanings of "intonation" and "tone" and how we apply them in English. As Loob says, a sentence could have a particular intonation pattern, a speech could not. However, we can use the word "tone" to mean a particular "flavor" or "color" or "feeling" which alter our mere words.

    "As he continued though his speech, what had first started as a mild garden-party greeting ceremony took on the tone of an impassioned political statement."
     

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    I agree with Dale.

    I work with speech repeatedly, and there's really a very great range of variation as far as actual intonation goes. Simply choosing a specific word doesn't automatically ensure a particular intonation. So I agree that maybe you're thinking of something other than actual intonation (i.e. "pitch" or "frequency"), and I'd use the same terms as Dale to describe it ("flavor" or "color" or "feeling").
     
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