Fit in Vs Blend in [at a party]

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sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos!:)

When I feel uncomfortable or misfit at an event or a party that I don´t know the other guests , I have to fit in or blend in? I´m afraid I´ve heard these verbs a couple of times in this situation mentioned above, well, Which one shall I use? and Is there a tiny difference between them?

Thanks,

Sam:cool:
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    My opinion: to fit in is to look as if you belong somewhere. To blend in is to look like everything around you to such a degree that you are difficult to single out, that there are virtually no aspects that differentiate you from those around you.
     

    Davidvs91

    Senior Member
    English - American
    There is a slight difference. I tend to think of fitting in as the act of involving oneself, or of being accepted into a group, while blending in is more of an appearance of fitting in.

    For example, if I go to a party where I do not know people, I will start up a conversation with someone to try to fit in. If I am in a bad neighborhood, I will try to blend in so as to not draw attention to myself.

    I'm not sure that I explained myself properly, I hope I did.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I agree that there is a subtle difference between the two.

    To fit in means to be amongst similar things/people. "He's an outsider, he simply doesn't fit in here", you might say of a strange neighbour or an odd work colleague. It is also very commonly used in the negative, as in my example.

    Blending in is as described by bibliolept, to merge into a group so as to be indistinguishable from the rest. It can also be used for objects in relation to their surroundings - "that painting on the wall blends in perfectly" - and is, I think, less likely to be used in a negative sense (although it is perfectly possible).
     

    bbip

    Senior Member
    English GB
    I agree with bibliolept. To fit in is more to feel accepted socially and getting on with everyone because you are similar. To blend in generally means to be so similar as to not really be noticed.
    In your context I would use to fit in - "I find it difficult to fit in with the other guests..."
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I'm inclined to go the other way. Both are equally possible but if the aim is to feel part of the group, not to stand out like "a spare part" (as we say in Scotland) - to get into the mix - then it may be more accurate to say that you find it difficult to blend in?

    Also might it be the case that fitting in has more of an element of permanency about it - I find it difficult to fit in around here - whereas blending in would apply to an immediate situation?
     

    bbip

    Senior Member
    English GB
    Given the context though, surely you would not say that you want to 'blend in' with the guests, rather 'fit in?'
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Hmm, I would want to blend into the company (but maybe that says more about me as a person than anything else!)

    Again, I think both are almost equally acceptable in this context.
     
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