Five years her senior

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

My teahcer said that the sentence "Her elder brother is five years her senior" means "Her elder brother is five years older than her". But this sounds quite new to me. I haven't heard it before.

Is it idiomatic to say so?

Thanks a lot
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, I hear this, but maybe not very often? You can also say 'five years her junior'.
     

    Kryptonite1303

    Senior Member
    India - Tamil & English
    I guess the term is used usually in the context of academics/profession. So, I'm not surprised your teacher said that but had a relative used that word it might sound a bit odd.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Five years her junior means Five years younger than one, right?
    Yes, it means 'five years younger'. It doesn't strike me as being more formal. I associate it with the elder generation. My mother would use this expression.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    "X years one's senior" sounds fine, and I hear it often enough to know this expression and use it myself.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I guess the term is used usually in the context of academics/profession. ...
    I wouldn't say that. It's a bit formal, but it can be used anywhere. It's usually used to refer to people's ages, not to how long they've been in a job or at a school, so it doesn't have any particular connection to the academic or professional worlds.
     
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