"Fix" breakfast / dinner / meal

NickJunior

Senior Member
Khmer
I heard someone said this: Tonight I will help my mother fix dinner. Is it correct say fix dinner? I think the person means to make dinner.
 
  • twen

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. - English
    Yes, but "fix" is an informal use for some people. The funny thing is that the formal defininition is "repair," so "to fix dinner" means to make it edible!

    :)
     

    NickJunior

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    I appreciate your helpful replies, Dimcl and Twen. Sonofspm, you and I we need to learn more of the informal English phrases. Thank you for offering your input.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    --I am back.
    --Oh, you are home late, you must be tired, can I fix you something?
     

    loggats

    Member
    British English
    "I'm fixing breakfast."

    Is this expression particularly American? And is it used all over the USA, or limited to certain regions?

    I've never heard it used in British English but don't know about Canadian, Australian or other varieties.

    << Joined to previous thread. >>
     
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    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It doesn't matter which meal you're fixing, loggats. You can even fix snacks, dessert, etc.

    << Thread merged.>>
     
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    loggats

    Member
    British English
    Thank you for the link, sdgraham. Maybe this thread could be useful by providing a little more information -

    is the use exclusively American?
    is it universal or limited to certain states?

    I'd never heard it before, and it sounded strange - but fun!
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I've heard people use it everywhere I've ever been in the U.S., Loggats. I don't think its use is restricted to any particular region over here.
     

    alekscooper

    Member
    Russian
    Yep, I've heard it too a bunch of times. If I'm not mistaken, one can also fix something to drink.

    Also, I've heard that I'm fixing to do something is used as I'm going to do something in the US in the Southern states.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Yep, I've heard it too a bunch of times. If I'm not mistaken, one can also fix something to drink.

    Also, I've heard that I'm fixing to do something is used as I'm going to do something in the US in the Southern states.
    I agree with all that have said that fixing a meal/drink, etc., is fine.

    But "I'm fixing to do something." is not the same context, Aleks.

    When one says "I'm fixing supper.", it means, I'm making supper (right now). Not, I'm going to make supper.

    Gosh, this is hopefully understandable.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    For this British speaker, to "fix" a meal is an Americanism. I would say "make breakfast" . I might sometimes say "I'm going to get the dinner on " (start preparing dinner).
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, I don't think I'd ever say this.

    There are 33 examples of 'fix breakfast' in COCA* but none in BNC.** (Accessed here.) I think it's safe to conclude it's American. I'd say making or preparing or cooking (if it's a cooked one) or even doing breakfast.

    *Corpus of Contemporary American English
    **British National Corpus
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I feel this sense of fix is an Americanism too, and the OED agrees:
    14b. In wider sense (chiefly U.S. colloq.): To arrange, get ready, put in order; to put to rights, make tidy, ‘rig up’; spec. to prepare (food or drink).
     

    clemdane

    New Member
    English - American
    Definitely an Americanism and widespread across the states, though there might be some regions where it isn't used.

    I was trying to find out the history of how the word came to be used in this meaning in American history because an old friend of mine who is German and who has lived in the U.K. for over 20 years heard me say it and told me, "That is the stupidest expression I've ever heard. " That spurred me on to try to find some historical facts to back me up and give it legitimacy so I can argue back with him! But so far I cannot find a specific derivation for this use of the word. I assume the etymology is the same as for other uses of the word, i.e.., not a homophone with a distinct etymology, but I'd love to find something concrete to rebut him with.
     

    KDH

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Conversation added to previous thread: Cagey, moderator.

    I know "I'll fix supper" is okay. Then, what about:

    I'll fix a meal.
    I'll fix breakfast.
    I'll fix lunch.
    I'll fix dinner.

    Can I say them all naturally in daily conversations?
     
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    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    "What fixings have you got?" means what food have you got for dinner in AE. (Albeit a little old fashioned.)

    < Threads merged. Thank you. Cagey, moderator. >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Ronch

    New Member
    Hebrew
    This post is very interesting, i was looking for the "fix a meal" phrase because i remembered hearing it too and surprisingly we use the same phrase in a kind of old-fashioned hebrew, there are so many equivalents in hebrew and it never ceases to surprise me
     

    Aneja.me

    New Member
    Hindi
    I believe, Fix means that the meal is already cooked, fixing food means arranging it on the table to eat
     
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