fixing (fixings)

KYC

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hello, there:
The scenario is that Mary wants to treat friends for a meal. She wants to make meal by herself but there is not any food at home. Therefore she needs to go to the supermarket to get some food. So she said that "I have to buy some fixings from the supermarket for the lunch."

My question is that do I misuse the term "fixing".
Is it natural to say "Buy some fixings" in the scenario?

May I have your clarification?
Thanks a lot!
 
Last edited:
  • Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    We might use "fix" in the sense of "prepare" or "make" a meal:

    I will fix you something to eat.

    But I have never heard it used to refer to buying the ingredients.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I think this is an American usage. We talk about the "fixings" for a particular dish. It is a colloquial synonym for ingredients.

    I'd like to bake a cake, but I don't have all the fixings.
    Would you like hamburgers? Just go to the store and buy the fixings while I start up the grill.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I would say 'the fixings', not 'some fixings'. Most Google hits for the fixings refer to DIY bits, but there are some for food:

    Add a little imagination, and with a little kitchen confidence and know how you've got the fixings for a wonderful dessert that the whole family will enjoy.

    I told her not to worry and together we went to the store and got the fixings for tomato spinach soup.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Yes, I missed that, etb. We don't say "some fixings", but "the fixings". Is it used in the UK, too?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Well, I'm familiar with it and hadn't flagged it as AmE, but I don't want to assert I've seen it used here. I could have got it from one particular foodie friend in Vermont.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If we were being a bit less colloquial, we would also say "ingredients".
    It can also mean something like "the usual accompaniments" as in "For Thanksgiving Dinner, we're having turkey and all the fixings" or "loaded baked potato with all the fixins" ('g' intentionally omitted:)).
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In the UK we would say 'ingredients'.
    Yes - I haven't come across "fixings" with this meaning.
    It can also mean something like "the usual accompaniments" as in "For Thanksgiving Dinner, we're having turkey and all the fixings" or "loaded baked potato with all the fixins" ('g' intentionally omitted:)).
    The turkey [beef, chicken etc] expression would be "... with all the trimmings" in BrE.
    I really don't know about the baked potato:(.
     

    KYC

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I learned that I can say it but it depends on where I am.
    Thanks for your clarifications and correction, everyone.
    It's helpful!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top