fizzy dizzy

  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi all!

    When a concert is crazy, ironic and funny, can I say that it is "a fizzy dizzy concert"?

    Thank you very much!
    We had a similar question yesterday, in which we learnt that the young put -izzy at the end of words to indicate approval and amusement.

    This would be a f??? deal concert, I suspect.
     

    Nurnen

    Member
    Italian (Italy)
    you could but i have never heard it before... people may know what you mean (i would get an idea) but they may be slightly confused

    you could say instead that it was 'harem scarem' which means kind of 'all over the place'
    Harem scarem? It's an idiomatic expression I didn't know. Thank you very much, boozm :)

    We had a similar question yesterday, in which we learnt that the young put -izzy at the end of words to indicate approval and amusement.

    This would be a f??? deal concert, I suspect.
    In the concert they'll parody famous songs (but without using coarse language or similar!). Just for fun :)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Harem scarem? It's an idiomatic expression I didn't know. Thank you very much, boozm :)


    In the concert they'll parody famous songs (but without using coarse language or similar!). Just for fun :)
    Hi Nurnen,

    Am I right, in your view, to think that dizzy means deal? What does fizzy mean? Or am I being overhopeful to think that such words might mean anything?
     

    Perdue

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK English
    Dizzy does not mean deal - it means when one feels unbalanced, and everything is spinning round.
    Fizzy is most obviously used to describe carbonated drinks, and doesn't sound right in this context.

    I would use the term 'eclectic', which would indicate that the concert covered all types of styles, tastes etc.

    If you simply mean that the concert was good fun, you could say it was 'crazy', or better still 'wild', which retains this meaning, and is quite positive.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Dizzy does not mean deal - it means when one feels unbalanced, and everything is spinning round.
    Fizzy is most obviously used to describe carbonated drinks, and doesn't sound right in this context.

    I would use the term 'eclectic', which would indicate that the concert covered all types of styles, tastes etc.

    If you simply mean that the concert was good fun, you could say it was 'crazy', or better still 'wild', which retains this meaning, and is quite positive.
    Hi Perdue,

    Now I'm not going to say that dizzy does not mean when one's head feels unbalanced, and everything is spinning round for two reasons:

    1. Dizzy can mean that.
    2. I'm very careful about seeming to contradict another poster in a thread.

    I'm sure you'd agree that words can mean more than one thing, and these words cannot surely mean that the concert is to be characterised by fits of delirium brought on by overindulgence in carbonated drinks.

    Fizzy we all know can mean cool in modspeak: cf. Urban dictionary:

    When something is strangely good, with a bubling sensation. Can apply to music, people, and every day life situation.
    Colourful things are usually considered fizzy.
    Can also be the same as cool.

    That leaves dizzy to be explained, if indeed we've found the right sense of fizzy.

    My young tell me I've confounded -izzy endings with the hep habit of -izzle endings, as in kizzle dizzle, hepspeak for cool deal. I have probably lost my way in this unfamiliar labyrinth by making this startling discovery on the 16th August.
     

    Perdue

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK English
    Hi TT,

    Firstly, apologies if my earlier post was rude, that was not my intentions.

    Whilst I agree that dizzy means more than one thing, I attempted to explain that dizzy was not synonymous with 'deal', and explained what its most common usage was. I am still uncertain that it is the right word to be used in this context, although of course my uncertainty does not mean that it's wrong!

    I had not come across fizzy used in the context you provided here - and would still question whether it was a familiar term to most young people, but you're quite right, my contradicting your earlier post was most unfair and I do apologise for this.

    Perdue xx
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi TT,

    Firstly, apologies if my earlier post was rude, that was not my intentions.

    Whilst I agree that dizzy means more than one thing, I attempted to explain that dizzy was not synonymous with 'deal', and explained what its most common usage was. I am still uncertain that it is the right word to be used in this context, although of course my uncertainty does not mean that it's wrong!

    I had not come across fizzy used in the context you provided here - and would still question whether it was a familiar term to most young people, but you're quite right, my contradicting your earlier post was most unfair and I do apologise for this.

    Perdue xx
    Hello Perdue,

    Thank you for your kind words. Think no more of it.

    We must work together to find a solution if such a thing does exist. Speaking for myself, I find the habit of the young to change endings of words misleading at best. We learnt two days ago that dizzle was modspeak for deal, among some young people, and the urban dictionary suggests that fizzy has that new meaning for some.

    The original poster wanted to know whether he could call his concert a 'fizzy dizzy' concert. At one level we could reply that he could, of course, if he wishes, but we owe it to him to work out what the words might convey. 'Not much' is the obvious answer we both might have given initially, but an argot exists among the young - I'm still unclear if it's a BE or an AE argot, or both, and we need some of the younger members, perhaps - and there are some very articulate ones - to give a word confirming or rebutting our speculations.
     

    Perdue

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK English
    I think it is probably AE - being (relatively) young and with younger siblings, I am fairly sure that 'fizzy dizzy' would not convey any sort of meaning to people in the UK. (although yes, a younger member could confirm this)

    As during the concert "they'll parody famous songs (but without using coarse language or similar!)" you could move away from the words 'fizzy' and 'dizzy' as they cause confusion...

    ...I'm trying to think of a modern, or in some cases, less cringe-inducing term along the lines of 'wacky' or 'off the wall'.

    Could one say it was a spoof concert? Or satirical? These don't really convey the fact that it is youths discussing the concert.

    In other words, I'm a bit stuck!
     

    Nurnen

    Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Maybe I'm just being weird here, but I would interpret it as fizzy - effervescent, lively (atmposphere?) and dizzy - crazy, goofy. Not some other words + izzy or izzle.
    You got it!

    Fizzy = effervescent and so - in a wider sense - a lively atmosphere

    dizzy = because it give a dizzy feeling (but in a positive sense: because of music and fun), something crazy in a "good way".


    Anyway, I think that a simpler "crazy" could work: crazy concert is also a sort of alliteration and it sounds good to me.

    Thank you very much to all of you :)
     

    charisma_classic

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.A.
    Hello,

    I just wanted to add my thoughts to this conversation. I hear a lot of the "-izzy" and "-izzle" endings used during my daily life, both on television and by a number of my friends' younger siblings.

    If someone told me, "Man, that concert was fizzy dizzy!" I would interpret this as a "f------g dope" concert - meaning that it was really great. Generally (and with thankfully less frequency) they take the first phoneme and add "-izzy" or "-izzle" to create the new word.

    ~Charisma
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello,

    I just wanted to add my thoughts to this conversation. I hear a lot of the "-izzy" and "-izzle" endings used during my daily life, both on television and by a number of my friends' younger siblings.

    If someone told me, "Man, that concert was fizzy dizzy!" I would interpret this as a "f------g dope" concert - meaning that it was really great. Generally (and with thankfully less frequency) they take the first phoneme and add "-izzy" or "-izzle" to create the new word.

    ~Charisma
    Hello Charisma,

    Thank you for these further startling insights. When you say that it would mean that this was a 'dope' concert, does that mean a musical, or, at least, noisy event at which stupifying drugs were easy to obtain? or does it have some other connotation?
     

    charisma_classic

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.A.
    Hello,

    This use of the word "dope" has nothing to do with music or drugs. Rather, it is a slang use of the word by which it is a synonym for "awesome" or "fantastic".

    ~Charisma
     
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