Flagrantes do Rxx = Some kind of person ?

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indigoduck

Senior Member
Canadian English
Ola a turma,

Flagrantes do Rxx = Some kind of a person ?

Please explain.

Obrigado desde ja.

Abracos.
 
  • Soldumapraia

    Member
    American English
    I've noticed that when I see Flagrado! during a news cast it makes sense to translate it as caught in the act! Therefore I would assume that Flagrante means the person that was caught in the act...yes?
     

    indigoduck

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I've noticed that when I see Flagrado! during a news cast it makes sense to translate it as caught in the act! Therefore I would assume that Flagrante means the person that was caught in the act...yes?
    Yes, this is closer to what i thought ...

    Is there a root verb to these words such as Flagrar or similar ?
     

    Soldumapraia

    Member
    American English
    flagra from WR dictionary.
    flagra sf ato observável no momento in the act expr
    evidente, patente flagrant adj

    flagrar from dicionário Aulete
    v.
    1. Bras. Pop. Pegar em flagrante: A mulher flagrou o marido com a outra
    2. Realizar um flagrante: O morador flagrou o policial na hora do crime
    [F.: Do lat. flagrare.]
    flagrar
    2 (fla.grar)
    1. P.us. Pegar fogo; arder em chamas; QUEIMAR: O edifício inteiro flagrou
    [F.: Do lat. flagro, as, avi, atum, are. Hom./Par.: flagra (fl.), flagras (fl.), flagra (sf. [pl.]).]
     

    anaczz

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    I've noticed that when I see Flagrado! during a news cast it makes sense to translate it as caught in the act! Therefore I would assume that Flagrante means the person that was caught in the act...yes? :cross:
    Flagrante is the act itself or its "proof" (a foto, a video, etc.)

    Flagrante can be an adjective, with the very same sense of "flagrant" in "a flagrant disregard for the law".

    But, in the present case, flagrante is a noun.

    Flagrado = past participle of v. flagrar.

    All these words came from lat. flagrare (be on fire, flame)

    Edit.: Flagra is slang, a short for flagrante,
     
    Last edited:

    indigoduck

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Flagrante is the act itself or its "proof" (a foto, a video, etc.)

    Flagrante can be an adjective, with the very same sense of "flagrant" in "a flagrant disregard for the law".

    But, in the present case, flagrante is a noun.

    Flagrado = past participle of v. flagrar.

    All these words came from lat. flagrare (be on fire, flame)

    Edit.: Flagra is slang, a short for flagrante,
    Muito obrigado Anaczz e Soldumapraia
     
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