flake

AlistairCookie

Senior Member
English - U.S.
I'm supposed to go have lunch with him, but he can be flake sometimes.

Normalement on dois dejeuner mais il peut être un peu "original"


Kind of the sense of tête dans l'air, but not someone who forgets things, but that you can't always count on him for things like meeting for lunch.
 
  • Missrapunzel

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    distrait?
    On devrait déjeuner ensemble mais il se peut qu'il soit distrait.
    It means he may lose focus on the lunch appointment and not show up.
     

    dcgirl

    New Member
    U.S. English
    a "flake" in this sense is more like a person who is "peu fiable", I think. Or maybe just "peu excentrique". I'm not sure if there is a similar (colloquial) title in French for such a person, though.
     

    Ransome

    New Member
    Québec français
    ...and in People who flake?

    D'après ce que j'ai lu précédemment, est-ce que ça pourrait vouloir dire : les gens qui posent un lapin, ou bien les m'a-tu-vu ?

    Could anybody please help me with this precise meaning?

    Thanks!
     

    dcgirl

    New Member
    U.S. English
    in people who flake, it means people who are unreliable / don't follow through, or sometimes someone who will "bail (out) on" others as in laisser tomber.

    I think poser un lapin is more about a date, isn't it? Personally I'd say he/she "stood me up". But a friend that may not show up to a party he said he would go to, or maybe leave at the time I really need help: he might flake.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    a "flake" in this sense is more like a person who is "peu fiable", I think. Or maybe just "peu excentrique". I'm not sure if there is a similar (colloquial) title in French for such a person, though.
    Thanks for the description, as this is a pure AE word. I couldn't find the word in any UK dicts, but found it here. They explain it as an "oddball" :confused:, which doesn't quite fit your description; I'm confused
    ...and in People who flake?
    D'après ce que j'ai lu précédemment, est-ce que ça pourrait vouloir dire : les gens qui posent un lapin, ou bien les m'a-tu-vu ?…
    Poser un lapin à qqn.: Ne pas être au rendez-vous convenu = to skip on a date. “M’as-tu-vu” is a show-off

    Totallylost202's suggestion ("faire faux bond à qqn") describes the character well, but isn't AlistairCookie after a noun :confused: ?

    If so, and based on the Merriam definition, I suggest:
    un “rigolo”, “farfelu”, “excentrique”, “malotru”, goujat”, ‘saligaud”, “canaille”, “fripouille”, “salopard”, “vaurien”… I’m sure a French viewpoint would help here (hint hint…;))

    If AlistairCookie wants the expression, than "faire faux bond" and "poser un lapin" are good, imo :)

    What are you after AC?
     

    dcgirl

    New Member
    U.S. English
    To be honest, I have never heard anyone say someone was a flake and ever meant someone was eccentric or and oddball. (Maybe it was used this way decades ago??) In the AE world today, at least, to flake or a person who is a flake is far more on the unreliable side than eccentric.

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/flake
    See #2 Verb & #2 Noun

    urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=flake
     

    floise

    Senior Member
    U.S.;English
    dcgirl,

    I don't know if there are regional variations, but I'm from Boston, and the use of the noun 'flake' to describe someone as being weird is fine. It might be getting a bit old-fashioned. People might say 'Oh that guy...he's a flake'.

    I've never heard it used as in the original sentence of Alistair Cookie: he's flake (without the determiner 'a').
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    … In the AE world today, at least, to flake or a person who is a flake is far more on the unreliable side than eccentric.

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/flake
    See #2 Verb & #2 Noun

    urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=flake
    Thanks a lot for these links, they are both a great help :thumbsup:. Ideally, we need the slang/colloquial word for "un poseur de lapin", which doesn't quite work :(
     

    Ransome

    New Member
    Québec français
    Ideally, we need the slang/colloquial word for "un poseur de lapin", which doesn't quite work :(
    En effet, on peut «poser un lapin» et conjuguer le verbe, mais je ne crois pas qu'on puisse étendre l'expression à «un poseur de lapins». L'expression figée se limiterait à la forme verbale.

    Si on considère «poser un lapin» au sens large, au sens de «faire faux-bond» par exemple, la personne qui les pose pourrait être qualifiée de «tire-au-flanc», de personne «pas fiable». Dans certaine régions du Québec, on parle d'un «chokeux» (calqué sur l'anglais to choke), dans un registre très populaire. Ex: «Ce gars-là, c'est un chokeux» ou «Mon ami était censé venir m'aider à déménager, mais il m'a choké

    Maintenant, si on prend «poser un lapin» au sens de «ne pas se rendre à un rendez-vous galant[a date] », on espère à tout le moins que personne ne le fasse assez souvent (ne jamais se présenter à ses rendez-vous galants) pour qu'on puisse lui coller cette étiquette! Sinon, je qualifierais carrément cette personne d'«arnaqueur»!
     

    Punky Zoé

    Senior Member
    Pau
    France - français
    Hi

    Just a question : how insulting is flake ? Do you use it as a reproach to an unreliable preson or in a lighter manner, for somebody you know absent-minded but you can't blame for that ?

    Anyway, I think we don't have such a word in French because nobody here is a flake. :D
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Si on considère «poser un lapin» au sens large, au sens de «faire faux-bond» par exemple, la personne qui les pose pourrait être qualifiée de «tire-au-flanc», de personne «pas fiable». Dans certaine régions du Québec, on parle d'un «chokeux» (calqué sur l'anglais to choke), dans un registre très populaire. Ex: «Ce gars-là, c'est un chokeux» ou «Mon ami était censé venir m'aider à déménager, mais il m'a choké
    Tu as bien écrit... certaines régions. J'ai surtout entendu "tchokeux" pour les sports. Dans ce sens de to choke
    (usually in sports) to fail to do something at a time when it is urgent, usually because you suddenly lose confidence.He could score points at will during the qualifying matches, but in the final he completely choked.
    Mais je n'ai jamais entendu le verbe sous la forme pronominale dans le sens de poser un lapin.
    Dans mon entourage, ce serait surtout il m'a lâché/planté là/laissé tomber. C'est un lâcheur.
     

    Punky Zoé

    Senior Member
    Pau
    France - français
    C'est un lâcheur.
    C'est ce qui me parait le plus proche, mais cela colle moins bien, pour quelqu'un qui s'engage à faire quelque chose et qui ne le fais pas.

    On dirait peut-être en langage familier/argot "il est pas fiable"
     

    dcgirl

    New Member
    U.S. English
    Punky Zoé -

    A mild insult? One more often hears "he/she's a flake". I feel most people would object a little if he/she were called a flake in person. But I might tell a friend he's "flaky" [with -y, as if to soften it] when annoyed at his unreliability.

    Although six friends I spoke w/ today (from different regions of the US, to be sure this time) have variations on what "a flake" is, we all generally agree what it means to be "flaky" or "to flake (on someone)".

    In fact, we have a friend here we know to be flaky. I think it's not that he cannot help it. Sometimes it may be because he isn't strong enough to say No in the first place, or when it comes time to leave he suddenly doesn't feel like going, or maybe something else comes up.. but he never lets us know if he won't show up. - He's a nice guy, but not someone we would totally rely on.
     

    madlutin

    Member
    France, French
    hi,

    in France, we would hardly say "un lâcheur", we would more use the verb, also in the context where somebody let you down in a situation you were counting on them.

    I have a friend who is a flake, and we used to say that she was "peu fiable" (general), "elle m'a planté" when not coming to a rendez-vous, or just "elle est toujours en retard" (more specific),

    After reading all the previous explanations, I am not sure we have a proper word for it. I would use "peu fiable"
     
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