Flat tire

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roniy

Senior Member
ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
"I have a flat." is it understood without any context that I talk about a tire ?
Dictionary.com defines flat as "A deflated tire. "
But I know know the usage
" flat tire"
so according to their definition I can say just " flat" and it'll be understood .

What do you think??

and when you say " the tire is going flat" you mean that it is going to "A stretch of level ground"??? (this is another definition of "flat").
Thanks.
 
  • Sallyb36

    Senior Member
    British UK
    Not without any other context. You would say I have a flat tyre if you hadn't already spoken about your car.

    If you were already speaking to someone about your car then you could say I have a flat and it would be understood. I think it's always best to say I have a flat tyre.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Sallyb36 said:
    Not without any other context. You would say I have a flat tyre if you hadn't already spoken about your car.

    If you were already speaking to someone about your car then you could say I have a flat and it would be understood. I think it's always best to say I have a flat tyre.
    OK , I see it . thank you so much :)

    And what about the second question ???

    Thanks.
     

    Christine-Brinn

    Member
    British English - UK
    No it would not always be understood to mean that.

    There are two common meanings to the noun flat. One is flat tyre and the other is an apartment.

    However, the usual expression when referring to a flat tyre by using flat on its own, is always to refer to it as a flat.

    It could still mean an apartment, so some context is necessary, just to make sure, even though most English speakers would probably think of a flat tire first.

    The answer to your second question is that the sentence The tyre is going flat will always be taken to mean that it is deflating.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Christine-Brinn said:
    No it would not always be understood to mean that.

    There are two common meanings to the noun flat. One is flat tyre and the other is an apartment.

    However, the usual expression when referring to a flat tyre by using flat on its own, is always to refer to it as a flat.

    It could still mean an apartment, so some context is necessary, just to make sure, even though most English speakers would probably think of a flat tire first.

    The answer to your second question is that the sentence The tyre is going flat will always be taken to mean that it is deflating.
    Thank you for your explanation. I think I understand it.
     

    SweetMommaSue

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA/American English
    roniy said:
    "I have a flat." is it understood without any context that I talk about a tire ?
    Dictionary.com defines flat as "A deflated tire. "
    But I know know the usage
    " flat tire"
    so according to their definition I can say just " flat" and it'll be understood .

    What do you think??

    and when you say " the tire is going flat" you mean that it is going to "A stretch of level ground"??? (this is another definition of "flat").
    Thanks.
    Hello roniy,

    Well, over here in the States, if you say simply, "I have a flat," it will be understood to mean a flat tire as we don't use the term "flat" for apartment as they do across the pond. ;)

    "The tire is going flat" definitely means that the tire is deflating and needs to be repaired or replaced.

    Smiles! :D
    Sweet Momma Sue
     

    MathE

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec
    Hello!
    Does someone know an equivalent from England for a "flat tire"? Because flat tire comes from USA and we need a proper term from England.

    thanks
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    Another possibility came to my mind: "blown tire".

    But one has to be careful when using the verb "blow". Don't you remember the story about the penguin?

    A penguin is driving his car through the desert of Nevada. As he pulls into a small desert town his air conditioning--which of course was on full blast--starts to blow luke warm, then hot air. Luckily he sees an auto repair shop so he pulls in. The mechanic says that it may take a while so the penguin leaves him the keys and starts to walk around the block.

    As luck would have it he finds an ice cream vending machine and he eagerly gets an ice cream cone to cool himself off. As he walks some more the ice cream starts to melt and gets all over his face and down his chin. He arrives back at the auto repair shop. The mechanic looks up from car's engine and says to the penguin, "It looks like you blew a seal."

    The penguin protests, "No....It's just some melted ice cream."
     

    sloopjc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Puncture is the likely saying for a flat tyre in the UK. A "flat" sounds AE to me. We say flat tyre when we leave the car and return to it some time later to find it in this state. Puncture is more immediate.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hello!
    Does someone know an equivalent from England for a "flat tire"? Because flat tire comes from USA and we need a proper term from England.

    thanks
    It's a flat tyre round here too. It's got a puncture, sure enough, but it's still a flat tyre, flat wheel, or just a flat.
     

    Eric001

    Senior Member
    Chinese-Beijing
    Hello, everyone
    Which one of the following sentences about a flat tire sounds right or natural to you native speakers?

    A: a pricked tire
    B: a tampered tire

    << Second question removed by moderator. Please keep to one topic in each thread. >>

    Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Broccolicious

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi Eric

    I'm afraid neither of those sound natural to me - please could you give us the context? Has someone deliberately damaged the tyre?

    Broc

    NB 'Tire' is American English. 'Tyre' is British English.
     
    Last edited:

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    "Tyre" in BE, "tire" in AE.

    "Tamper" means to interfere with something. I would also say "a punctured tire".
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hello, everyone
    Which one of the following sentences about a flat tire sounds right or natural to you native speakers?

    A: a pricked tire
    B: a tampered tire [...]
    Hello Eric, welcome to WordReference.

    As has been said, neither of these sounds at all natural (neither A nor B is a sentence, of course).

    I have added this question to previous discussions on this topic.
    There is useful information in earlier posts.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I still wouldn't call that a tampered tyre.
    It's a tyre that has been tampered with.
    Tamper is rarely a transitive verb, and not with this meaning, so it is very odd to use tampered as a participle/adjective.
     

    Eric001

    Senior Member
    Chinese-Beijing
    Thanks a lot for the helpful replies, everyone
    I see the point now.

    Ps: Wordrefence is really a paradise for non-native English learners. I wish I had come here earlier.
     
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