flat tyre and puncture

catcan

New Member
Catalunya (Catalan, Spanish)
Is there any difference between having a flat tyre\flat tire and a puncture in your pneumatic? In what context I should use one or the other?
 
  • hikesterson

    Senior Member
    English/US
    I have never heard the expression, "punctured pneumatic." I am wondering if you are mis-translating pneumático to pneumatic. In U.S. English, pneumatic is not a synonym for tire. Pnuematic refers to any tool that uses pressurized air, like a pneumatic drill.
    In any case, flat tire is the most common expression.

    Edit:
    After doing a quick search, I saw that technically a pneumatic tire refers to any tire that is inflated with air. But again, pneumatic is not used (colloquially especially) as a synonym for tire.
     

    Kevin R

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    A tyre can be flat without being punctured; it may not have been inflated properly, or the air may have escaped from the tyre via a leaking tyre valve.
    On the other hand, a puncture is a hole or tear in the tyre surface, usually by a nail or other sharp object piercing the tread or sidewall.

    <Spanish phrase removed by moderator (Florentia52)>
     
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    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    <Threads have been merged at this point by moderator (Florentia52)>

    Hello guys,

    are all these expressions ok?


    I´ve got a flat tyre. I´ve got a puncture.

    My car/bike got a flat. My car/bike got a puncture.

    My tyre got a flat. My tyre got a puncture.
     
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    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    :)I am asking if all these sentences are ok.<-----Off-topic comment removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->
     
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    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Reading back through the earlier posts should answer your question. Can you explain what is still confusing you?
     

    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    In this thread, there is only mentioned the usage of the expression "having a flat tyre" and "having a puncture". I have heard here many times how context is important. So I put the expression "get a flat" and "get a puncture" into different sentences to find out if the usage is possible or if it sounds wrong.

    <-----Off-topic comment removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->
     
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    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "I've got a flat" and "I've got a puncture" are both fine, at least in BrE.

    You can use "my bike"/"my car"/"my tyre" as the subject, but don't forget the auxiliary verb.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    A punctured tyre and a flat tyre are not the same thing.

    A puncture allows air to escspe from the tyre and may lead to a flat, but there are other ways that a tyre can become flat.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In casual American English, any tire that has lost enough air to make it worth adding some air is a "flat tire." It doesn't need to be literally flat (completely deflated). You can tell that it's been punctured because it's "flat" (technically just low) so we don't bother with "punctured" :). We can say "My tire looks a little flat. I think I'll put some air in it tomorrow."
     

    MedaBeda

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Thank you all for your explanations - these explanations are so much better than the first 2 reactions where I felt like on April Fools´ Day :)
     
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