flat, wide strip

aurora068

Member
Croatian
hi, everyone!

can someone, please, explain to me what would ''flat, wide strip'' mean in the following sentence - ''They'd pulled up in front of the Sloan Center for Bright Minds, a hippie experimental school on a flat, wide strip of boring-looking three-story buildings in Flushing, Queens.''

thanks in advance :)
 
  • "strip" in this meaning is similar to ribbon, it is describing a series of buildings laid out on a limited piece of land which has dimensions like a fat wide ribbon.

    It can be also used to mean the street on which the buildings rest.

    There is a famous area/street in Los Angeles, CA called "Sunset Strip."
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ''They'd pulled up in front of the Sloan Center for Bright Minds, a hippie experimental school on a flat, wide strip of boring-looking three-story buildings in Flushing, Queens.''

    Does it mean that the Sloan Center is one of these boring-looking three-story buildings?
    ... That "on" here is equivalent to "on <name of street>".
    ... Or that "strip" here is equivalent to "street"?

    The notion of the Sloan Center being on top of the boring-looking buildings is hard for my non-AE brain to shake off.
     
    PJ, it's not the best sentence in the world, is it? Too many modifiers strung together.

    So...BE does not use the expression " a strip of land?" If not, it does mean just literally that, a piece of land in the the shape of a strip, like a long, long narrow piece of unrolled cloth.

    As used here, I have to take it that the buildings are of course not ON the street, but set back from it, but it's implying that there are not lots of other building behind them, and they themselves do not jut back much, and they are in some kind of narrow row.

    I think we don't know whether or not the Sloan Center is occupying one the boring buildings or not, or had set itself up in great contrast right next to them.

    *Strip" as a street or district name is such an obscure and singular usage I probably shouldn't mentioned it because it confused the issue.

    Of course, if the hippie school was experimenting with LSD, maybe the Sloan Center WAS on the top of the buildings, or looked like it was after you took the drugs!;)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Our dictionary tells us that this is a North American use of strip:
    2. a long, narrow area of land.
    chiefly N. Amer. a main road lined with shops and other facilities.
    The following seems normal to me:
    ... Mr. Babilla, located on a strip of bars and nightclubs near the city's Convention Center, may be one of the oldest clubs in Cartagena .... Church-going and club-hopping in Cartagena, Colombia The Village Voice (Aug 11, 2005).
    I don't know whether it would make the original sentence seem more coherent to Panjandrum, but it would sound better to me if it were:
    ... a hippie experimental school located on a flat, wide strip of boring-looking three-story buildings in Flushing, Queens ...
     
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