Flats for rent

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Carlos 82

New Member
Spanish
What do you understand by "london flats":
1. Flats for rent
2. Flats for sale

If you were searching for flats in europe (just say in london) to stay just a few days or 2 weeks, what keywords would you use in Google?

"london flats" or what?

Thanks.
 
Last edited:
  • Suspishio

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I Googled the term "holiday lets in London" and what you described was well in evidence.

    So for British English, "holiday lets" is appropriate. That's what came to mind first, anyway.
     

    Carlos 82

    New Member
    Spanish
    Well, the context can be business, holidays, ... though when you go to another country almost always it is for vacation.

    I want to know the most common keyword when you search in google for a flat to rent. Cause I though that people that wants "flats in london to rent" may search "london flats".

    I just ask cause I don't think is english, and it may be different in my language.

    Thanks.
     

    Suspishio

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The key phrase in your first post was "to stay just a few days or 2 weeks".

    But fair enough you didn't mention "holiday". On the othe hand, taking your key phrase seriously, "holiday lets" will give you just what you want for a short business stay.

    So I Googled "short term lets in London" with a similarly positive result.

    Hope that helps.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Look for "vacation rentals" or something like that.
    Depends on which part of Europe. For London, it would be better to try BE terms. 'Vacation' is AE for what is normally 'holiday' in BE. It would also be unusual to talk about 'rentals' (as opposed to 'rent' or 'lets') in relation to accommodation in the UK.

    In other parts of Europe, you might also try 'apartment' or 'accommodation' instead of 'flats'.
     

    Carlos 82

    New Member
    Spanish
    So do you think that an average european citizen may use 'apartment' instead of 'flat'?

    Example:
    "madrid apartments"
    "madrid flats"
    "madrid lets"

    (if the client were searching for short term)

    Thanks.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    So do you think that an average european citizen may use 'apartment' instead of 'flat'?
    Depends on which country in Europe and what kind of English the schools teach. I think you might use apartment in France because of the existence of the cognate French word appartement. Or Appartement in German and apartamento in Spanish.
     

    Suspishio

    Senior Member
    English - England
    So do you think that an average european citizen may use 'apartment' instead of 'flat'?

    Example:
    "madrid apartments"
    "madrid flats"
    "madrid lets"

    (if the client were searching for short term)

    Thanks.
    I Googled all three of the above with similar (and to my mind) satisfactory results. So, practically, I believe it doesn't matter which European country you're aming for.

    This effectiveness could be attributable to Google with its powerful search engine that equates words like "Apartment" and "Flat". Also the phrase "short term Madrid" will draw "apartments", "flats" and "lets".

    So, Carlos, I think we're there.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    So do you think that an average european citizen may use 'apartment' instead of 'flat'?.
    There is no standardized "Continental European English." Common usage in Europe varies not just between countries, but also between individuals.

    Many Europeans are familiar with AmE words and phrases because of their exposure to American popular culture. This is particularly true in the case of younger people from countries where movies and TV series are subtitled rather than dubbed. On the other hand, formal English instruction in Europe tends to be BrE-based.

    In this case, I would say that "apartment" is considerably more common than "flat", which strikes me as largely UK-specific.
     

    Carlos 82

    New Member
    Spanish
    I Googled all three of the above with similar (and to my mind) satisfactory results. So, practically, I believe it doesn't matter which European country you're aming for.

    This effectiveness could be attributable to Google with its powerful search engine that equates words like "Apartment" and "Flat". Also the phrase "short term Madrid" will draw "apartments", "flats" and "lets".

    So, Carlos, I think we're there.
    The thing is that I can only use one for my english domain name (for technical reasons). What would be your choice: "Apartments" or "Flats"?

    Thanks, we're there.


    There is no standardized "Continental European English." Common usage in Europe varies not just between countries, but also between individuals.

    Many Europeans are familiar with AmE words and phrases because of their exposure to American popular culture. This is particularly true in the case of younger people from countries where movies and TV series are subtitled rather than dubbed. On the other hand, formal English instruction in Europe tends to be BrE-based.

    In this case, I would say that "apartment" is considerably more common than "flat", which strikes me as largely UK-specific.
    So if I understand well:
    - Flat is for UK and >30 aged people (BrE)
    - Apartment is for young <30 aged people (AmE)

    Is it correct?

    Thanks.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    So if I understand well:
    - Flat is for UK and >30 aged people (BrE)
    - Apartment is for young <30 aged people (AmE)
    No, I was just making a general statement about younger Europeans being familiar with AmE words and phrases. In this particular case, "apartment" is almost certainly the better choice, regardless of the age of your customers. I would only use "flat" if your customers are primarily British.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    No, I was just making a general statement about younger Europeans being familiar with AmE words and phrases. In this particular case, "apartment" is almost certainly the better choice, regardless of the age of your customers. I would only use "flat" if your customers are primarily British.
    Sorry, but I have to disagree. The German English students mostly learn "flat" at first. Although there is the word "apartement" in German it´s not the same as a "Wohnung" (flat). It´s usually a well equipped "upper class" flat here.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Sorry, but I have to disagree. The German English students mostly learn "flat" at first. Although there is the word "apartement" in German it´s not the same as a "Wohnung" (flat). It´s usually a well equipped "upper class" flat here.
    Interesting point.

    Still, if there is this slight disparity between the two meanings in Germany, wouldn't it be more desirable for Carlos 82 to use the more upscale term? After all, German companies that offer apartments for rent in English appear to prefer this term.
     
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