Flatter myself/ourserlves

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Agnus

New Member
Portugal, Portuguese
Could anyone explain to me what the expressions in bold below mean and/or provide a similar expression?

"Let us flatter ourselves that I may be the survivor"

"You must give me leave to flatter myself, my dear cousin, that your refusal of my addresses is merely words of course."

Both in Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen

Thanks a lot.
 
  • Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    I'm sure you'll be given better answers shortly, but I might say "let me dwell on the pleasant thought that..."


    P.S. I instantly recognised the second :D. Then the first :p
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Have you read the dictionary definition of "flatter"?

    Usually one would apply flattery to someone else, because a flatterer is always aware of the exaggeration and insincerity which may be part of the flattery, but the recipient thinks the statement is sincere and honest. As a result, there is some irony in speaking of flattering one's own self.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Have you read the dictionary definition of "flatter"?

    Usually one would apply flattery to someone else, because a flatterer is always aware of the exaggeration and insincerity which may be part of the flattery, but the recipient thinks the statement is sincere and honest. As a result, there is some irony in speaking of flattering one's own self.
    "To display to advantage" (M-W.com) seems an appropriate definition.
     

    Joobs

    Banned
    Glasgow, Scotland - English
    Could anyone explain to me what the expressions in bold below mean and/or provide a similar expression?

    "Let us flatter ourselves that I may be the survivor"

    "You must give me leave to flatter myself, my dear cousin, that your refusal of my addresses is merely words of course."

    Both in Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen

    Thanks a lot.
    As GWB stated these are phrases made in an ironic style.

    In both the speaker is saying that they know there is self-delusion at work but they wish to ignore the truth of the matter (for their own self-esteem).
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Could anyone explain to me what the expressions in bold below mean and/or provide a similar expression?

    "Let us flatter ourselves that I may be the survivor"

    "You must give me leave to flatter myself, my dear cousin, that your refusal of my addresses is merely words of course."

    Both in Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen


    Thanks a lot.​
    Knowing the book (and the story, of course), I would go for "indulge".
     
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