Flatter

  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Hello Adnan, how are you planning to use the word "flatter"? Please give us the sentence where you think you might use it.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    "My friend flattered me because I praised him for his good work"
    In this case you would say "My friend was flattered because I praised him"
    Compare this with: "My friend flattered my by praising me for my good work"

    The person receiving the praise is the one who is flattered. If I praise you for doing something and you are pleased by my praise, you will feel flattered.
     
    Last edited:

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    Remember that to flatter someone is to give lavish, often excessive or insincere praise.

    "You flatter me" means "I do not deserve your praise". It may suggest that you appreciate what the person is saying, but you think it is too much.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    Remember that to flatter someone is to give lavish, often (but not always) excessive or insincere praise.

    "You flatter me" means "I do not deserve your praise". It may suggest that you appreciate what the person is saying, but you think it is too much.
    "To flatter someone" can mean that but "to be flattered" by what someone says to you usually means that you take it as a compliment as in: Thank you Adnam, I am indeed flattered ;)
     

    Li'l Bull

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    I'm not sure I understand Adnan's question. My immediate reaction was "Well, the word 'flatter' is polite enough in itself". I mean, "Are you trying to flatter me?" is the polite version of the ruder "Are you trying to brown-nose me?" or "Are you trying to suck up to me?", is that correct?
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I'm not sure I understand Adnan's question. My immediate reaction was "Well, the word 'flatter' is polite enough in itself". I mean, "Are you trying to flatter me?" is the polite version of the ruder "Are you trying to brown-nose me?" or "Are you trying to suck up to me?", is that correct?
    It may well be but that is not the question Adnan asked ;) See post #4
     
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