flesh & blood

abusaifali

Member
Arabic
Hi all,
Is it okay to express a resemblance between two brothers and say it like this "it's James blood and flesh just a little darker". Trying to say that the brother has a very clear resemblance except the skin color.
Thank you guys
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello :)
    No it isn't OK to say that. "Flesh and blood" is a set expression, a collocation or idiom, of very limited use.
    I suggest: "They resemble each other ( in every respect) except (James') skin is a little darker".

    :)
    Hermione
     

    Cameljockey

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello :)
    No it isn't OK to say that. "Flesh and blood" is a set expression, a collocation or idiom, of very limited use.
    I suggest: "They resemble each other ( in every respect) except (James') skin is a little darker".

    :)
    Hermione
    You're right, but I think the OP might be looking for a colourful expression.

    Some are:
    They are like two peas in a pod.
    X is the spitting image of Y.
    X is a dead ringer for Y (quite slangy).

    With all of these, you can add 'except...'
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    also:

    "a near-clone"

    "could be twins"

    "like twins separated at birth"

    "penguins" (All penguins look alike--this might not work depending on how you use it.)
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Does like two drops of water ring a bell with anyone?
    It's used in several other languages including mine and I was wondering if it exists in English.
    I've seen a good many Google hits for it, and not only in reference to the Dutch movie.
     

    Cameljockey

    Senior Member
    British English
    Does like two drops of water ring a bell with anyone?
    It's used in several other languages including mine and I was wondering if it exists in English.
    I've seen a good many Google hits for it, and not only in reference to the Dutch movie.
    I never heard it in BEng so may not be very common.
     

    Cameljockey

    Senior Member
    British English
    also:

    "a near-clone"

    "could be twins"

    "like twins separated at birth"

    "penguins" (All penguins look alike--this might not work depending on how you use it.)
    They're like penguins?? Really? That's so funny. Is it used like that? I can imagine that maybe you are looking at a husband and wife in matching Christmas sweaters and making a slightly sarcastic comment to your friend? :)
     
    Last edited:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    They're like penguins?? Really? That's so funny. Is it used like that? I can imagine that maybe you are looking at a husband and wife in matching Christmas sweaters and making a slightly sarcastic comment to your friend? :)
    It is often stated that "all penguins look alike" (but probably not to their mothers).

    See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penguin

    (Scroll down to "In poplular culture".)

    The tendency of penguins to form large groups feeds the stereotype that they all look exactly alike, a popular notion exploited by cartoonists such as Gary Larson.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Ah, so it's not a recognised expression, that's a shame.
    I think it is a recognized notion, but not a recognized phrase. You would have to write your own phrase to represent that notion.

    an example:

    They could have been penguins; they looked so much alike.
     
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