flesh/meat?

kinagm21

Member
España: español
Hi!
Another irrelevant question!How do you say when you are seeing an operation? You are seeing flesh or meat? I think we must use meat just for meal... For example: "I can`t stand seeing neither blood nor flesh"...

Thank you!
 
  • volky

    Senior Member
    Spanish/English
    hi!
    another irrelevant question! how do you say when you are seeing an operation? you are seeing flesh or meat? i think we must use meat just for meal... For example "I can`t stand seeing neither blood nor flesh"...

    thank u!

    The word surgery is more used than operation. Ex. Open heart surgery. More than meat, one refers to the open wound and the flesh, as you mentioned.


    p.s. Pay more attention to the grammar.
     

    tanager

    Senior Member
    US/English
    No, no, you are definitely not seeing meat! (Well, you are, but for something a bit larger with lots of teeth...)

    A small correction: "I can't stand seeing blood or flesh."

    Also, "blood and flesh" is a little formal. Is that your intention? The common phrase is "blood and guts," as in a movie with lots of violence.
     

    kinagm21

    Member
    España: español
    Thank you! yes you are right! I should have done it better!
    Regarding to "operation" or "surgery" I just partly agree with you...I`m not sure, of course, but for example I think is more suitable to say "a throat operation" than "a throat sugery" isn`t it?
    Anyway, thank you very much!
     

    madmorty

    Member
    England - English
    Thank u! yes u r right!I should have done it better!
    Regarding to "operation" or "surgery" I just partly agree with u...I`m not sure, of course, but for example I think is more suitable to say "a throat operation" than a "throat sugery" innit?
    Anyway..thank u very much!

    I agree with you here, I think the correction to 'surgery' was a little pedantic to be honest. You would say 'see an operation' and not 'see surgery'.
     

    madmorty

    Member
    England - English
    Thank u! yes u r right!I should have done it better!
    Regarding to "operation" or "surgery" I just partly agree with u...I`m not sure, of course, but for example I think is more suitable to say "a throat operation" than a "throat sugery" innit?
    Anyway..thank u very much!

    Although, of course, 'throat surgery' is just as valid as 'a throat operation'. Just make sure you drop the indefinite article when you use 'surgery'.
     

    volky

    Senior Member
    Spanish/English
    A juzgar por los resultados de Google, throat surgery se usa más, pero operation es perfectamente usado también.

    Resultados 1 - 10 de aproximadamente 1,590,000 de throat surgery
    Resultados 1 - 10 de aproximadamente 1,310,000 de throat operation.

    :)
     

    kinagm21

    Member
    España: español
    Ok, thank you very much!
    I really appreciate your comments!
    I will not forget to drop the article! thank you!!
    I like the set phrase "blood and gut".
    Thanks
     

    kinagm21

    Member
    España: español
    A juzgar por los resultados de Google, throat surgery se usa más, pero operation es perfectamente usado también.

    Resultados 1 - 10 de aproximadamente 1,590,000 de throat surgery
    Resultados 1 - 10 de aproximadamente 1,310,000 de throat operation.

    :)
    whoa! that is a really well done and exhaustive search!
    Since u seem to be bilingual, could you have a look at another threat called "silly laugh", please? I know is really unlikely that this expression exists in English...
    thank u!
     

    volky

    Senior Member
    Spanish/English
    Se supone que para esta nueva pregunta usted cree un nuevo hilo. De todas formas le respondo que silly laugh es una risa tonta y en la búsqueda de google obtuvo aproximadamente 2,000,000 resultados.

    Le exhorto a que lea las reglas del foro, para que obtenga el mejor beneficio.
     

    scotu

    Senior Member
    Chicago English
    Just a suggestion for your future posts: Use proper punctuation, capitalization, grammar and correct spelling, including accents and tildes. "Chat-speak" is not acceptable. Because this is a language forum, those who use it as a reference in the future deserve to find correct language here. Following this rule in your future posts will help you to get better responses and make your contributions a more valuable tool for future reference.
     

    kinagm21

    Member
    España: español
    Se supone que para esta nueva pregunta usted cree un nuevo hilo. De todas formas le respondo que silly laugh es una risa tonta y en la búsqueda de google obtuvo aproximadamente 2,000,000 resultados.

    Le exhorto a que lea las reglas del foro, para que obtenga el mejor beneficio.

    Le advertí que el hilo ya estaba abierto. De hecho, le cité literalmente el nombre del mismo. Recurrir a "google" puede ser muy útil pero siempre es mejor la opinión directa de una persona.
    De todos modos muchas gracias.
     

    kinagm21

    Member
    España: español
    Thank you very much for your suggestion. I will try to not do it again.
    I have seen loads of "chat-speak" messages and they were absolutely comprehensible even though little mistakes were made. Anyway, thank you very much.
     

    volky

    Senior Member
    Spanish/English
    Le advertí que el hilo ya estaba abierto. De hecho, le cité literalmente el nombre del mismo. Recurrir a "google" puede ser muy útil pero siempre es mejor la opinión directa de una persona.
    De todos modos muchas gracias.


    :( Mis disculpas, cometí el error de mirar el tema de su pregunta y no registré lo demás, sobre que era otro hilo.
     

    Juan Carlos Garling

    Senior Member
    Spanish Chile/Argentina
    Hi!
    Another irrelevant question!How do you say when you are seeing an operation? You are seeing flesh or meat? I think we must use meat just for meal... For example: "I can`t stand seeing neither blood nor flesh"...

    Thank you!
    The Anglosaxons resented the Norman invasion and used the Anglosaxon word for a living being but, in contempt, when it was dead the Norman word (which was actually French).

    So they would use the germanic word flesh (Fleisch in German) when the animal was alive but meat (from French mouton) when the animal was dead.

    In the same way, the referred to sheep (Schaf in German) when the animal was living but to mutton (again from French mouton) when it was dead and eaten.

    For humans the correct word is flesh either dead or alive.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    The Anglosaxons resented the Norman invasion and used the Anglosaxon word for a living being but, in contempt, when it was dead the Norman word (which was actually French).

    So they would use the germanic word flesh (Fleisch in German) when the animal was alive but meat (from French mouton) when the animal was dead.

    In the same way, the referred to sheep (Schaf in German) when the animal was living but to mutton (again from French mouton) when it was dead and eaten.

    For humans the correct word is flesh either dead or alive.

    Actually meat is a germanic word too and used to mean food.

    Now, I thought the prestigious French word was used for the gourmet dish on the table as opposed to the common animal you see "on the hoof".

    Here are some more examples of the distinction:

    animal (from native English) - meat (from French)
    deer - venison
    sheep - mutton
    ox/steer - beef
    calf - veal
    hog/pig - pork
    chick - pullet
    fowl - poultry
     
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