flood, swamp

< Previous | Next >

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hello, last night when I talked to someone, she encouraged me talking to others, to be an eye-opener, and she said only doing so can you gain the understanding from others.

Then I said:

I don't need too much understanding, if there is too much understanding, I will be swamped (flooded) by it.

Does it make sense to you, if I just want to express I don't need too much understanding?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Sure, I can understand what she means. She doesn't want to be overwhelmed by other people offering her too much understanding. When she says she'll be swamped/flooded by it, she means that it's too much. She doesn't like this much "understanding".
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We can be either flooded or swamped by a lot of anything, although to my mind being swamped definitely implies too much and would rarely be used in a positive sense whereas flooded and flood in can be.

    Hermione
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    My teacher told me "I was swamped" means " I was very busy", but I am not sure whether "swamp" could be used also in other ways.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    My teacher told me "I was swamped" means " I was very busy", but I am not sure whether "swamp" could be used also in other ways.
    I agree with your teacher about the usual meaning of "I was swamped." Most of the time I hear people use the expression to say "I was really busy and had more to do than I could keep up with". I also hear "flooded" and "swamped" used to describe any excessive stimulation. I think I hear "flooded" more: My house is flooded with the sound of traffic from the highway.

    When your correspondent mentioned being "flooded/swamped" with understanding, I understood it to mean "I don't like being overwhelmed with the 'understanding' of other people".
     

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    We can be either flooded or swamped by a lot of anything, although to my mind being swamped definitely implies too much and would rarely be used in a positive sense whereas flooded and flood in can be.

    Hermione
    This headline from 01/08/2010 gives a positive use of 'swamped':

    Lindsay Lohan is swamped by fan mail in the slammer

    Though she is in prison, which is not a good place to be, the fan mail itself is a positive.
    I might also say I have been swamped with get well cards and good advice. There may be too much to take in or to act on but the intentions are positive.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top