flours / types of flour

Caroline56

New Member
French
Hello, I have got a big doubt... Can we say "flours" with the letter S or do we say "types of flour" ? Thanks a lot. Caroline
 
  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I agree with the above and for what it's worth my daughter has a small baking business going and I've never heard her say "flours" only types of flour. I think also because "flours" sounds like "flowers" it wouldn't be used, certainly never in spoken English.
     

    Caroline56

    New Member
    French
    I agree with the above and for what it's worth my daughter has a small baking business going and I've never heard her say "flours" only types of flour. I think also because "flours" sounds like "flowers" it wouldn't be used, certainly never in spoken English.
    Thanks a lot :)
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    True, Keith. For a moment I thought 'everything' might be uncountable but then I remembered the song ' ... all kinds of everything remind me of you' :)
     

    Wordy McWordface

    Senior Member
    English - SSBE Standard British
    Wow! Amazing, LondonBoy.
    I had never heard 'a flour' before.
    Cheers.
    Not amazing at all. :) This is a perfectly normal usage. There are lots of different types of flour.
    In fact, I think it's safe to assume that most physical substances (food, drink, cosmetics, fabrics, materials and so on) can have a countable or uncountable form. If you're talking about a particular type, variety or form of these substances, we use the countable form. For example, 'Buckwheat is a versatile flour that can be used in a variety of dishes, such as pancakes and scones'.
     

    Wordy McWordface

    Senior Member
    English - SSBE Standard British
    Intersting, sound shift.

    Does it mean I couldn't say one flour either?
    In some contexts, you can say 'one flour'. For example, 'One flour that I particularly like is rye flour. It adds a nutty denseness to breads such as pumpernickel'.
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Pas forcément mon cher dessert :) There are two flours that I love to use: farine montilienne and London flour.
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    oui, dans un tel contexte c'est parfaitement possible :) pourquoi tu es si surprise? On peut dire "deux farines" en français, n'est-ce pas?
     

    tartopom

    Senior Member
    French
    broglet, je ne suis pas surprise par le français, je suis surprise par l'anglais.
    Du coup, je suis perdue. Toi, tu me dis que ça se dit 'two flours' et WMcW me dit que ça ne se dit pas.
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    One other point: we have to beware of homophonic ambiguities. If someone asks you to bring flowers to a funeral, they won't be happy with wholemeal, self-raising and farine montilienne :D
     
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