flow of thunder

Gabriel Aparta

Senior Member
Español - Venezuela
Hi everyone, please, from The Great Gatsby:

Outside the wind was loud and there was a faint flow of thunder along the Sound.

What do you think he means by that?

Thanks!
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I'd like to know the precise meaning of "flow" in the phrase "a flow of thunder" in the chapter five of The Great Gatsbyby F. Scott Fitzgerald:... | eNotes

    There's something ominous about Fitzgerald's choice of words here. "Flow" implies a continuous process, one that will stretch on into the future. The flow may be distant now, but that won't always be the case. Life will go on, and as it does so, the flow of thunder will only get stronger and stronger. There is an obvious foreshadowing here. There are serious troubles ahead for all the main characters—tragedy, conflict, emotional upheaval, and death.

    There are a great many comments on that here: Outside the wind was loud and there was a faint flow of thunder along the Sound. - Google Search
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Although you probably realize it, anyone coming across this line for the first time needs to keep in mind that "the Sound" is Long Island Sound: that is, a large body of water between Long Island and the mainland, rather than the ordinary word meaning "something that you hear."
     
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