fluent oral English

tony389

Member
Chinese
When giving a praise that one's oral English is good:
  • Your oral English seems very fluent.
  • Your oral English seems to be very fluent.
  • You have very fluent oral English.
  • The oral Enlgish you pronounced is very fluent.
I wonder which one is the best, or other better expressions?
 
Last edited:
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I suggest "spoken English" instead of "oral English".

    The first two both work. The third doesn't sound natural and the fourth is wrong because "pronounced" isn't the appropriate word.

    A simpler alternative might be: You speak English fluently.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The normal term is “spoken English”. Your first three versions are okay, but not the last.

    But I would probably just have said: Your [spoken] English is very good. And if it’s said during a conversation with the person, then the word “spoken” is superfluous anyway.
     

    tony389

    Member
    Chinese
    Thanks for the replies. It's in conversation. Generally I get it the simpler version is the best. But in addition, I always tend to/instinctively add "seem/seem to" in this cases, if added, what nuances would it make? Does is make the praising sound less sincere?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I always tend to/instinctively add "seem/seem to" in this cases, if added, what nuances would it make?
    "Seem" can suggest that the speaker is not entirely sure of what he's saying.

    You speak English fluently = Your English is fluent.
    You seem to speak English fluently = Based on what I've heard so far, your English is fluent. (But I'm not absolutely sure that's the case.)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You speak English well — a clear compliment
    You seem to speak English well — said as though you’re either unsure or surprised, so less of a compliment
     
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