fluent reading (CV)

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teacup2

Senior Member
Finnish
Hello,

Is it good English to say on a CV that you have fluent reading skills? Can one list the languages, and say "Russian (read fluent)" after "French (fluent)"? Or "Russian (readING fluent)"?
What I mean to say is that as for French, my oral, written and reading skills are all fluent, but in Russian, only my reading skills are. Or are there better alternatives?

Looking forward to your advice!
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Fluent doesn't sound quite right for reading. I associate fluency with speech (or writing) and a quick check in our dictionary backs me up.

    I don't know what to advise as a substitute. Perhaps you could say advanced reading? or wait for better brains to advise you!
     

    cybermagi

    New Member
    English-USA
    This is where American English andBritish English differ. The word fluent in the Oxford AmericanCollege Dictionary can be used for spoken or written proficiency . Sowith out knowing what version of English you require you have twodifferent answers.


    For America based English, Russian (read fluently) is adequate.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    On my CV, I have a section that goes something like this, although I'm making up the languages:

    Spanish (native)
    Finnish (fluent)
    Czech (reading)

    I would agree with the British people here, since I consider fluency and reading knowledge of a language to be rather different.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I like Lucas's solution best. I don't think "written" works for a language in which you say you are good at reading but don't claim proficiency in writing; the two are different.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    This American also agrees with lucas and Parla, and disagrees with cybermagi; I would find the statement "I read Russian fluently, but do not speak it fluently, or understand it fluently when it is spoken" to be very odd. The word at its root suggests flowing, and while speech can flow off your tongue, it is difficult to grasp how words can flow out of a book into your eyes.
     

    Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    :thumbsup: This American also agrees with lucas and Parla, and disagrees with cybermagi; I would find the statement "I read Russian fluently, but do not speak it fluently, or understand it fluently when it is spoken" to be very odd.

    :thumbsup: Spanish (native)
    Finnish (fluent)
    Czech (reading)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    This is where American English andBritish English differ. The word fluent in the Oxford AmericanCollege Dictionary can be used for spoken or written proficiency . Sowith out knowing what version of English you require you have twodifferent answers.


    For America based English, Russian (read fluently) is adequate.
    I do not understand why you think thes defintions are different. What I said was our defintion allows fluency for speaking and writing. The probelm is the OP wants to talk about READING.
     
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