flush days of her roll

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
Hi, I couldn't find anything helpful about the link between "flush days of her roll" and "the Stolichnaya Vodka". What does it refer to?

Example
: In the pursuit of euphoria and numbness, she is a busy and resourceful person. At one point, she even had money to fund her downfall, a surprise inheritance from an aunt, almost all of it gone in just a few years to the Five O’Clock company, and in the early, flush days of her roll, to the Stolichnaya family.

Source: The Best American Short Stories 2012 (Best American R) (p. 2). Mariner Books.

Background: A daughter is cleaning up for her 60 year-old, extremely drunk mother who had one too many vodka and collapsed in the bathroom. She's had a rough career and suffered from an abusive husband, which is why she's become depressed and begun seeking solace in alcohol.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    to be flush = to be in possession of more than enough money, The flush days = the days when she had more than enough money.

    a roll = a period of good luck/fortune

    She has spent all her money on Stolichnaya vodka
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Roll is short for bankroll. From the Word Reference dictionary:
    bankroll /ˈbæŋkˌrəʊl/ chiefly US Canadian n
    • a roll of currency notes
    • the financial resources of a person, organization, etc
    flush /flʌʃ/ adj (usually postpositive)
    • level or even with another surface
    • directly adjacent; continuous
    • informal having plenty of money
    • informal abundant or plentiful, as money
    When she had a lot of money, she drank expensive, imported vodka (Stolichnaya) but she had to switch to the cheap stuff (Five O'Clock).
    Stolichnaya is not the name of a family who bottles the vodka (the company that produces Bacardi rum is owned by the Bacardi family), but the author seems to think it is.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I had always understood it as
    This comes from the games that use dice and rely on you getting given good rolls in order to do well - if the dice comes up with the numbers you predicted, then you were on a roll - the more rolls that when in your favour the more luck you had.

    And thus it moved over from gaming parlance into the general consciousness, and being on a roll is synonymous with consistent good fortune.
    http://www.saidwhat.co.uk/phrase-finder/phrase48

    But this seems less romantic and more likely
    on a roll
    1. experiencing a period of success or good luck They were on a roll, winning nine games in a row. With a growing economy and a dropping crime rate, the city has been on a roll. Related vocabulary: have a good thing going
    2. talking for a period of time My mother loved to gossip, and she had a hard time stopping once she was on a roll.
    Etymology: based on the idea that something which is rolling tends to continue rolling
    http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/on+a+roll
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I don't think I would that say she was "on a roll". She got one inheritance one time. The few years of being in a drunken stupor were probably not as much of a good time as it sounds. ;)
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thank you~ I missed the implication of her switch from (Five O'Clock) to (Stolichnaya). Yes, she's spent a lot of money on vodka and now is greatly increasing financial burdens on her daughter.
     
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